Colorado Capitol Watch
border Logo hdr_right_bottom

Bill Tracker

based on: Profile: RAQC

 
 
Loading... Please Wait
You have 32 bills in your selected Profile
download download to spreadsheet
download download to doc

Notes about this profile:


Bill: HB22-1007
Title: Assistance Landowner Wildfire Mitigation
DescriptionConcerning wildfire mitigation assistance for landowners.
Summary

Wildfire Matters Review Committee. Section 1 of the bill
establishes the wildfire mitigation resources and best practices grant
program (grant program) within the Colorado state forest service (forest
service). To be eligible to receive a grant, a recipient must be an agency
of local government, a county, municipality, special district, a tribal
agency or program, or a nonprofit organization.
The forest service is tasked with reviewing grant applications.
Grants must be awarded to applicants proposing to conduct outreach

among landowners in high wildfire hazard areas and the forest service
must consider the potential impact of the applicants' proposed outreach
when awarding grants.
The forest service must report to the wildfire matters review
committee on the grant program.
Section 2 repeals the existing income tax deduction created to
offset the landowner's costs incurred in performing wildfire mitigation
measures for the 2023 and subsequent income tax years.
Section 3 creates a state income tax credit to reimburse a
landowner for the costs incurred in performing wildfire mitigation
measures on the landowner's property. Specifically, a landowner with a
federal taxable income at or below $120,000 for the income tax year
commencing on or after January 1, 2023, as adjusted for inflation and
rounded to the nearest hundred dollar amount for each income tax year
thereafter, is allowed a state income tax credit in an amount equal to 25%
of up to $2,500 in costs for wildfire mitigation measures. The maximum
total credit in a taxable year is $625.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/28/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
P. Lee (D)
C. Simpson (R)
House:
D. Valdez (D)
M. Lynch (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/03/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1011
Title: Wildfire Mitigation Incentives For Local Governments
DescriptionConcerning the establishment of a state grant program that provides funding to local governments that dedicate resources for wildfire mitigation purposes.
Summary

Wildfire Matters Review Committee. The bill establishes the
wildfire mitigation incentives for local government grant program (grant
program) in the Colorado state forest service (forest service). The grant
program is established to provide state funding assistance in the form of
grant awards to local governments to match revenue raised by such

governments from a dedicated revenue source that is intended to be used
for forest management or wildfire mitigation efforts at the local level.
Such wildfire mitigation efforts include, without limitation, projects that
promote fuel breaks, forest thinning, a reduction in the amount or extent
of fuels contributing to wildfires, outreach and education efforts directed
at property owners and other members of the public, and any other means
of forest management or wildfire mitigation as determined appropriate for
funding by the forest service.
The grant program is administered by the forest service.
On or before March 1, 2023, the forest service is required to adopt
polices, procedures, and guidelines for the grant program that include,
without limitation:
  • Procedures and timelines by which an eligible recipient
may apply for a grant;
  • Criteria for determining grant eligibility and grant amounts;
and
  • Reporting requirements for grant recipients.
Any funding awarded under the grant program must match
revenues raised by the local government from a dedicated revenue source
that is intended to be used for forest management or wildfire mitigation
efforts at the local level in accordance with policies, procedures, and
guidelines developed by the forest service.
In allocating funding under the grant program, preference will be
given to certain eligible recipients based on prioritization factors
enumerated in the bill.
Eligible recipients may apply for funding from the grant program,
and the recipient's application for funding may be approved by the forest
service, before the local government has created a dedicated revenue
source that forms the basis for the match if the electors of the local
government approve a ballot issue creating the revenue source at an
election that takes place in the same calendar year in which the funding
is awarded.
The bill creates the wildfire mitigation incentives local government
grant program fund in the state treasury.
On or before November 1, 2024, and on or before November 1 of
each year thereafter, the forest service is required to publish a report
summarizing the use of all of the money that was awarded under the grant
program in the preceding fiscal year. The bill specifies additional required
components of the report. The report must be posted on the website of the
forest service. The bill requires the Colorado department of higher
education to summarize the information contained in the report in its
State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent
(SMART) Government Act hearings.
The bill requires the forest service to prepare educational materials
concerning the grant program and to display such materials on its official
website. In addition, the forest service is also required to undertake
outreach activities to inform local governments located in priority areas
for wildfire mitigation of the grant program.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/04/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
P. Lee (D)
T. Story (D)
House:
L. Cutter (D)
M. Snyder (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/03/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1012
Title: Wildfire Mitigation And Recovery
DescriptionConcerning healthy forests, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

Wildfire Matters Review Committee. Section 1 of the bill
creates the wildfire mitigation and recovery grant program (grant
program) in the Colorado state forest service (forest service) to provide
grants to help counties with forested areas prevent and recover from
wildfire incidents and ensure that such efforts are undertaken in a manner

that reduces the amount of carbon that enters the atmosphere. In
expending grant money, a county, to the extent practicable, shall ensure
that biomass that is removed from forests is recycled or disposed of in a
manner that reduces the amount of carbon that enters the atmosphere.
The forest service shall administer the grant program and, subject
to available appropriations, award grants out of money annually
appropriated to the forest service for the grant program. The forest service
shall review grant applications in consultation with the division of fire
prevention and control in the department of public safety and with the
Colorado forest health council in the department of natural resources.
The grant program is repealed, effective September 1, 2028.
Before the repeal, the grant program is scheduled for a sunset review by
the department of regulatory agencies. Section 2 schedules this review.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/06/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
P. Lee (D)
J. Ginal (D)
House:
D. Valdez (D)
L. Cutter (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/03/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1018
Title: Electric And Gas Utility Customer Protections
DescriptionConcerning a state regulated utility's practices regarding a customer's ability to pay the customer's utility bill.
Summary

Section 1 of the bill changes the date on which Energy Outreach
Colorado disburses to the department of human services a portion of the
energy assistance system benefit charges that investor-owned electric and
gas utilities collect from January 1, 2022, to March 1, 2023.
Section 2 requires the public utilities commission (commission)
to adopt rules prohibiting electric and gas utilities from disconnecting a

customer's service:
  • On weekends;
  • On state or federal holidays; or
  • After 11:59 a.m. on a weekday that is not a holiday.
Additionally, the commission's rules must require that, under certain
circumstances in which a customer makes a request for reconnection of
service on a Monday through Friday that is not a holiday, the utility is
required to reconnect the customer's service that same day.
Section 3 establishes 3 income standards for determining a
household's eligibility for utility assistance as follows:
  • A household income at or below 200% of the federal
poverty line;
  • A household income at or below 80% of the area median
income; or
  • A household income that meets the income eligibility
criteria that the department sets by rule.
Section 3 also clarifies that the commission may approve a
year-round utility preference or advantage given to income-eligible
customers.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/16/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House:
C. Kennedy (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (04/21/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1020
Title: Customer Right To Use Energy
DescriptionConcerning a guarantee of a customer's right to use energy.
Summary

The bill prohibits a state agency, local government, and common
interest community from limiting or prohibiting the use of natural gas,
propane, solar photovoltaics, micro wind turbines, or small hydroelectric
power for electricity generation, cooking, hot water, or space heating in
residences, units, or businesses.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/25/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
B. Kirkmeyer (R)
House:
D. Woog (R)
StatusHouse Committee on Energy & Environment Postpone Indefinitely (02/03/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1026
Title: Alternative Transportation Options Tax Credit
DescriptionConcerning the replacement of the income tax deduction for amounts spent by an employer to provide alternative transportation options to employees with an income tax credit for amounts spent by an employer for that purpose, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

Legislative Oversight Committee Concerning Tax Policy. The
bill replaces an existing income tax deduction for expenses incurred by

employers when providing alternative transportation options to employees
with a refundable income tax credit of 50% of such expenses for such
employers. The credit is allowed for income tax years beginning on or
after January 1, 2023, but before January 1, 2033.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/06/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
L. Liston (R)
C. Hansen (D)
House:
S. Bird (D)
D. Woog (R)
StatusSigned by the President of the Senate (05/31/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1124
Title: Tax Credit For Recycling An Old Vehicle
DescriptionConcerning the creation of an income tax credit for the purchaser of a new motor vehicle who at the time of purchase trades in an old motor vehicle for recycling.
Summary

For income tax years commencing on or after January 1, 2023, but
prior to January 1, 2028, the bill allows a $750 income tax credit to any
taxpayer that purchases a new motor vehicle (purchaser) and at the same
time trades in an old motor vehicle for recycling. The purchase of the new
motor vehicle and the trade in for recycling of the old motor vehicle are

required to occur through the same licensed motor vehicle dealer. The bill
defines a vehicle that is a 2015 model year or newer as a new motor
vehicle and a vehicle that is a model year 2009 or older as an old motor
vehicle.
The purchaser is required to assign the tax credit to the purchaser's
financing entity in a manner specified in the bill, and the financing entity
is required to compensate the purchaser for the full nominal value of the
tax credit. To complete the tax credit assignment, the purchaser and the
financing entity are required to enter into an agreement that identifies the
vehicle identification numbers of the old motor vehicle and the new
motor vehicle, includes certification from the licensed motor vehicle
dealer that the old motor vehicle will be traded for recycling pursuant to
current law, and satisfies all other requirements regarding the assignment
of the tax credit.
The financing entity is required to electronically submit a report
containing the information required in the agreement to the department
of revenue (department) in a form and manner to be determined by the
department. In addition, the financing entity is required to file the
agreement described with the original tax return for the taxable year in
which the old motor vehicle is traded in for recycling and a new motor
vehicle is purchased.
The licensed motor vehicle dealer that sells the purchaser the new
motor vehicle and takes the old motor vehicle for recycling is required to
certify, in a form and manner to be determined by the department, that an
old motor vehicle that is traded in for recycling for the purpose of
claiming the tax credit will be recycled in accordance with current law.
A licensed motor vehicle dealer that provides certification that it
will recycle an old motor vehicle but that fails to transfer the vehicle for
recycling is subject to a fine.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/01/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
B. Rankin (R)
House:
R. Pelton (R)
StatusHouse Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely (03/10/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1132
Title: Regulation And Services For Wildfire Mitigation
DescriptionConcerning the provision of wildfire mitigation services, and, in connection therewith, regulating controlled burns on private property.
Summary

The bill requires that a fire department (defined to include a fire
protection district as well as a county or municipality) be notified prior to
conducting a controlled burn on private property and prohibits a person
from conducting a controlled burn under certain conditions. The bill also
sets forth civil and criminal penalties for a person who does not provide

notice prior to conducting a controlled burn or otherwise violates the bill's
requirements.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/02/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
L. Liston (R)
House:
T. Exum Sr. (D)
R. Holtorf (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/03/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1140
Title: Green Hydrogen To Meet Pollution Reduction Goals
DescriptionConcerning the use of green hydrogen to meet statewide greenhouse gas pollution reduction goals.
Summary

The bill includes green hydrogen as a renewable energy resource
that certain retail electric service providers (providers) may use to meet
standards requiring that a certain percentage of the provider's electricity
sales be from an eligible energy resource. The bill also requires the
governor to update the Colorado greenhouse gas pollution reduction
roadmap to expressly include green hydrogen as a renewable energy

resource that providers may use to meet statewide greenhouse gas
pollution reduction goals for the electric utility sector.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/26/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:

House:
D. Valdez (D)
D. Woog (R)
StatusHouse Committee on Energy & Environment Postpone Indefinitely (04/13/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1218
Title: Resource Efficiency Buildings Electric Vehicles
DescriptionConcerning resource efficiency related to constructing a building for occupancy.
Summary

Section 1 of the bill relocates existing statutes that require
contractors to offer certain resource efficiency options when constructing
certain buildings. Section 1 also requires commercial buildings and
multifamily residences to include electric vehicle charging for at least
10% of the parking spaces if the building is 25,000 square feet or more
or if the building is part of a project that is 40,000 square feet or more of

floor space in more than one building, with a total of 25 or more sets of
living quarters or commercial units among all the buildings. These
buildings must also have:
  • The space in the electrical facilities to increase electric
vehicle charging to 50% of the parking spaces; and
  • Conduit run to increase electric vehicle charging to 50% of
the parking spaces.
Section 3 requires a master electrician to follow these
requirements when planning, laying out, and supervising the installation
of wiring in a building. Section 4 requires an architect to follow these
requirements when planning, drafting plans for, and supervising the
construction of a building. Continuing education requirements are put in
place to educate master electricians and architects about these
requirements.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (03/21/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
K. Priola (R)
F. Winter (D)
House:
A. Valdez (D)
StatusSigned by the Speaker of the House (05/20/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1244
Title: Public Protections From Toxic Air Contaminants
DescriptionConcerning measures to increase public protection from toxic air contaminants, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill creates a new program to regulate a subset of air
pollutants, referred to as toxic air contaminants, which are defined as
hazardous air pollutants, covered air toxics, and all other air pollutants
that the air quality control commission (commission) designates by rule
as a toxic air contaminant based on its adverse health effects. In
implementing the program, the commission has the authority to adopt

rules that are more stringent than the corresponding requirements of the
federal Clean Air Act.
Beginning no later than January 1, 2024, and every 5 years
thereafter, the commission will review the list of existing toxic air
contaminants and determine whether to add any additional toxic air
contaminants to the list.
On or before April 1 of each year, beginning on April 1, 2024,
owners and operators of major and synthetic minor sources of pollution
will submit to the division of administration (division) in the department
of public health and environment (department) an annual emissions
inventory report that reports the levels of criteria air pollutants and toxic
air contaminants that were emitted by the source in the preceding calendar
year, beginning with January 1, 2023, to December 31, 2023.
Beginning no later than January 1, 2024, the division will develop
a monitoring program to determine the concentration of toxic air
contaminants in the ambient air of the state. The monitoring program will
establish at least 6 long-term monitoring sites throughout urban and rural
areas of the state. The division must provide public notice of and an
opportunity to comment on the locations of the monitoring sites.
On or before November 1, 2025, and at least every 5 years
thereafter, the division will prepare a report summarizing the findings of
the monitoring program, provide public notice of and an opportunity to
comment on the report, and submit the report to the general assembly.
Beginning no later than July 1, 2027, the commission will identify
by rule toxic air contaminants that may pose a risk of harm to public
health in the state (high-risk toxic air contaminants) and adopt
health-based standards and emissions limitations (airborne toxic control
measures) for high-risk toxic air contaminants.
On or before July 1, 2032, and at least every 5 years thereafter, the
commission will review the health-based standards and airborne toxic
control measures to determine if the commission should:
  • Identify any additional high-risk toxic air contaminants;
and
  • Adjust the existing health-based standards and airborne
toxic control measures.
Beginning on July 1, 2027, when applying for a new or modified
air pollution permit that is subject to the new source review requirements
of the federal Clean Air Act, the owner or operator of a stationary
source of pollution must submit an analysis of the impacts of the
stationary source's emissions of toxic air contaminants on concentrations
of toxic air contaminants in the ambient air. The division may only
approve the application if the division determines, based on the analysis,
that the source's emissions will not contribute to an increase in
concentrations in the ambient air at or in excess of a health-based
standard.
Beginning on July 1, 2027, to protect public health and the
environment, the division may reopen any existing air pollution permits
and require the owner or operator of a stationary source of pollution to
submit to the division an analysis of the impacts of the stationary source's
emissions of toxic air contaminants on concentrations of toxic air
contaminants in the ambient air. If the division determines, based on the
analysis, that the source's emissions contribute to concentrations in the
ambient air at or in excess of a health-based standard, the division may
require a decrease or cessation in the applicable emissions over the
shortest practicable time until the emissions no longer contribute to
concentrations in the ambient air at or in excess of a health-based
standard.
The bill also creates the toxic air contaminant scientific advisory
board (advisory board) in the department. The advisory board consists of
3 voting members appointed by the executive director of the department
and a nonvoting member representing the department. Each member of
the advisory board shall:
  • Be professionally active or engaged in scientific research;
  • Be highly qualified to evaluate health effects from
exposure to toxic substances; and
  • Have expertise in pathology, oncology, epidemiology, or
toxicology.
The advisory board will advise the commission on identifying
toxic air contaminants and high-risk toxic air contaminants, establishing
and revising health-based standards for high-risk toxic air contaminants,
and reviewing and revising the list of covered air toxics.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/10/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Gonzales (D)
House:
C. Kennedy (D)
S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1362
Title: Building Greenhouse Gas Emissions
DescriptionConcerning the reduction of building greenhouse gas emissions, and, in connection therewith, requiring the director of the Colorado energy office and the executive director of the department of local affairs to appoint an energy code board that develops two model codes, requiring local governments and certain state agencies to adopt and enforce codes that are consistent with the model codes developed by the energy code board, creating the building electrification for public buildings grant program, creating the high-efficiency electric heating and appliances grant program, and establishing the clean air building investments fund.
Summary

The bill requires the Colorado energy office (office) to identify for
adoption 3 sets of model code language:
  • Model electric and solar ready code language;
  • Model low energy and carbon code language; and
  • Model green code language.
On or before January 1, 2025, municipalities, counties, the office
of the state architect, the division of housing, and the division of fire
prevention and control shall adopt and enforce an energy code that
achieves equivalent or better energy performance than the 2021
international energy conservation code and the model electric and solar
ready code language identified for adoption by the office.
On or before January 1, 2030, municipalities, counties, the office
of the state architect, the division of housing, and the division of fire
prevention and control shall adopt and enforce an energy code that
achieves equivalent or better energy and carbon emissions performance
than the model low energy and carbon code language identified for
adoption by the office.
In the event of a conflict between the 2021 international energy
conservation code, the 2024 international energy conservation code, or
any of these 3 sets of model code language and either the Colorado
plumbing code or the national electric code, the Colorado plumbing code
or the national electric code prevails.
The bill creates 2 primary grant programs:
  • The building electrification for public buildings grant
program to provide grants to local governments, school
districts, state agencies, and special districts for the
installation of high-efficiency electric heating equipment;
and
  • The high-efficiency electric heating and appliances grant
program to provide grants to local governments, utilities,
nonprofit organizations, and housing developers for the
installation of high-efficiency electric heating equipment in
multiple structures within a neighborhood.
The bill establishes the clean air building investments fund, a
continuously appropriated cash fund, to fund the creation,
implementation, and administration of both of these grant programs.
The bill also requires the following transfers from the general
fund:
  • $3 million to the energy fund created for the Colorado
energy office to issue grants and provide training related to
the 2021 international energy conservation code, electric
and solar ready codes, and low energy and carbon codes;
  • $10 million to the clean air building investments fund for
the creation, implementation, and administration of the
building electrification for public buildings grant program;
and
  • $12 million to the clean air building investments fund for
the creation, implementation, and administration of the
high-efficiency electric heating and appliances grant
program.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/13/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
C. Hansen (D)
House:
A. Valdez (D)
T. Bernett (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1372
Title: Emergency Engine Exemption Emission Regulation
DescriptionConcerning an exemption from air emission limits for the use of a stationary engine to support critical infrastructure in emergencies.
Summary

The bill authorizes the use of an emergency stationary engine if:
  • The emergency stationary engine is providing electric
power to or mechanical work for military facilities or
facilities under the control of the United States department
of defense;

  • The emergency stationary engine is in compliance with 40
CFR 60, subparts IIII and JJJJ, as in effect on January 1,
2022;
  • The emergency stationary engine's air pollution control and
monitoring equipment is installed, operated, and
maintained in compliance with the manufacturer's
standards; and
  • The emergency stationary engine is undergoing routine
maintenance or testing or providing primary electrical
power or mechanical work during an emergency situation
pursuant to 40 CFR 60 or 63, as in effect on January 1,
2022.
A person that operates an emergency stationary engine is required
to:
  • Minimize the use of emergency stationary engines as much
as practicable, consistent with the health, safety, and
welfare of the people of Colorado;
  • Report each emergency event that causes the engine to be
operated within the later of 48 hours after or noon on the
business day following the emergency event;
  • Record information about each emergency event; and
  • Submit compliance reports detailing the operation of the
engine, the reason for the operation, deviations, and
corrective actions.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/25/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Fields (D)
R. Gardner (R)
House:
T. Carver (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1379
Title: Wildfire Prevention Watershed Restoration Funding
DescriptionConcerning transfers from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to provide additional funding for the management of certain natural resources, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill requires the state treasurer to make the following transfers
from the economic recovery and relief cash fund:
  • $3 million to the healthy forests and vibrant communities
fund for projects that will help communities address the
urgent need to reduce wildfire risks by supporting

implementation of risk mitigation treatments that focus on
promoting watershed resilience;
  • $2 million to the wildfire mitigation capacity development
fund for wildfire mitigation and fuel reduction projects;
  • $10 million to the Colorado water conservation board
construction fund for watershed restoration and flood
mitigation grants;
  • $2.5 million to the Colorado water conservation board
construction fund for the direct and indirect costs of
providing assistance to political subdivisions and other
entities applying for federal Infrastructure Investment and
Jobs Act money and other federally available money
related to water funding opportunities; and
  • $2.5 million to the Colorado water conservation board
construction fund for issuing grants to political
subdivisions of the state for the hiring of temporary
employees, contractors, or both that will assist those
political subdivisions and other entities in applying for
federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act money
and other federally available money related to natural
resource management.
All of these transfers relate to essential government services and must
comply with the relevant compliance, reporting, record-keeping, and
program evaluation requirements established by the office of state
planning and budgeting and the state controller.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/20/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
K. Donovan (D)
C. Simpson (R)
House:
M. Catlin (R)
K. McCormick (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1381
Title: Colorado Energy Office Geothermal Energy Grant Program
DescriptionConcerning the creation of a geothermal energy grant program to facilitate the development of geothermal energy resources.
Summary

The bill creates the geothermal energy grant program (grant
program) in the Colorado energy office (office) within the office of the
governor. The grant program offers 3 types of grants:
  • The single-structure geothermal grant, which is awarded to
applicants that are constructing new buildings and that are

installing a geothermal system as the primary heating
system for the building;
  • The community district heating grant, which is awarded to
support ground-source, water-source, or multisource
thermal systems that serve more than one building; and
  • The geothermal electricity generation grant, which is
awarded to support the development of geothermal
electricity generation and hydrogen generation produced
from geothermal energy.
The bill sets qualifications, limits, and standards for awarding the grants.
A grantee is prohibited from using the money for any purpose not
specified in statute or in the grant application. Using the grant money for
another purpose subjects the grantee to a civil action seeking repayment.
The bill creates the geothermal energy grant fund (fund).The grant
money in the fund is allocated in the following percentages:
  • Up to 40% of the total money in the fund may be awarded
in grants for cost-matching public-private partnerships to
support the development of geothermal electricity
generation and resource development, which may include
hydrogen generation produced from geothermal energy;
  • Up to 60% of the total money in the fund may be awarded
in grants for constructing new buildings and remodeling
existing buildings using geothermal heating, and one-fourth
of the money must be awarded to eligible entities from or
projects in low-income, disproportionately impacted, or just
transition communities; and
  • Up to 25% of the total money in the fund may be awarded
in grants to support the development of district heating
systems in new construction or to retrofit existing
buildings.
The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to implement
the grant program. The state treasurer will transfer $20 million from the
general fund to the fund.
The office administers the grant program and, in doing so, must
develop and apply criteria for evaluating and awarding grant applications
that:
  • Prioritize projects in low-income, disproportionately
impacted, or just transition communities; and
  • Maximize the number of additional projects that would
otherwise not occur without grant money.
Each grantee must submit an annual report to the office for 2 years
following receipt of a grant award. By February 1, 2024, and each year
thereafter, the office must submit a report to the transportation and energy
committee of the senate and the energy and environment committee of the
house of representatives. The report must include:
  • The grant expenditures;
  • The percentage of each type of grant awarded;
  • The total amount of matching funds that grantees provided
to receive a grant;
  • The percentage of grants awarded to and for projects in
low-income, disproportionately impacted, or just transition
communities; and
  • To the extent available, the effects of the grants on gas use,
electricity use, emissions, and energy costs.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/10/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
R. Woodward (R)
House:
H. McKean (R)
B. Titone (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1384
Title: Naturopathic Doctor Formulary
DescriptionConcerning the naturopathic formulary.
Summary

The bill removes language limiting the naturopathic formulary to
nonprescription classes of medicines, including only biological
substances such as vitamins, minerals, nutritive substances, extracts, and
their products and residues.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (06/06/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:

House:
B. McLachlan (D)
Y. Caraveo (D)
StatusHouse Committee on Health & Insurance Postpone Indefinitely (05/02/2022)
Position

Bill: HB22-1401
Title: Hospital Nurse Staffing Standards
DescriptionConcerning the preparedness of health facilities to meet patient needs, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill requires every hospital to establish, by September 1, 2022,
a nurse staffing committee pursuant to rules promulgated by the state
board of health, either by creating a new committee or assigning the nurse
staffing functions to an existing hospital staffing committee. The nurse
staffing committee is required to create, implement, and evaluate a nurse
staffing plan and to receive, track, and resolve complaints and receive

feedback from direct-care nurses and other staff.
The bill requires a hospital to:
  • Submit the nurse staffing plan to the department of public
health and environment (department) on an annual basis;
  • Post the nurse staffing plan on the hospital's website;
  • Evaluate the nurse staffing plan on a quarterly basis and,
based on complaints and recommendations of patients and
staff, revise the nurse staffing plan accordingly; and
  • Prepare a quarterly report containing the details of the
evaluation.
The bill prohibits a hospital from assigning direct-care providers
to a nursing unit or clinical area of a hospital unless the providers are
properly trained in the unit or area assigned.
On or before September 1, 2022, in a form and manner determined
by rules promulgated by the state board of health, each hospital is
required to report:
  • The baseline number of beds the hospital is able to staff;
and
  • The hospital's current bed capacity.
If the hospital's ability to meet staffed-bed capacity falls below
80% of the required baseline in a specified period, the hospital is required
to notify the department and submit a plan to meet that requirement.
The bill requires the department to notify a hospital if the hospital's
number of staffed beds exceeds 80% of a hospital's total licensed beds
and fine the hospital if the hospital does not take corrective action.
Each hospital is required to update its emergency plan at least
annually and as often as necessary, as circumstances warrant.
The bill authorizes the department to fine a hospital up to $10,000
per day for the hospital's failure to:
  • Meet the required staffed-bed capacity;
  • Include the amount of necessary vaccines for
administration in its annual emergency plan and have the
vaccines available at each of its facilities; and
  • Include the necessary testing capabilities available at each
of its facilities.
The bill grants rule-making authority to the department and to the
state board of health.
The bill requires the department to report certain data to its
committee of reference as part of its presentation at the hearing held
pursuant to the State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and
Transparent (SMART) Government Act.
The bill requires the office of saving people money on health care
in the office of the lieutenant governor to study:
  • The level of preparedness of health facilities to respond to
post-viral illness resulting from the COVID-19 virus;
  • The effects of post-viral illness resulting from the
COVID-19 virus on the mental, behavioral, and physical
health and the financial security of the people of Colorado;
and
  • The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the cost of
health care in Colorado and on the resiliency of Colorado's
public health system.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/04/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
D. Moreno (D)
House:
K. Mullica (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (05/18/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-051
Title: Policies To Reduce Emissions From Built Environment
DescriptionConcerning policies to reduce emissions from the built environment.
Summary

The bill specifies that air-source and ground-source heat pump
systems are household furnishings exempt from the levy and collection
of property tax. The bill exempts air-source and ground-source heat pump
systems from the definition of fixtures for property tax purposes.
Beginning July 1, 2024, the bill exempts from state sales and use
tax all sales, storage, and use of eligible decarbonizing building materials.

Eligible decarbonizing building materials are defined as building
materials that have a maximum acceptable global warming potential as
determined by the office of the state architect.
In addition, beginning January 1, 2023, the bill exempts from state
sales and use tax all sales, storage, and use of air-source and
ground-source heat pump systems that are used in commercial or
residential buildings.
The bill specifies that a statutory town, city, or county may exempt
the same items only by express inclusion of the exemption in its initial
sales tax ordinance or resolution or by amendment thereto.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/29/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
C. Hansen (D)
House:
E. Sirota (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-073
Title: Alternative Energy Sources
DescriptionConcerning alternative energy sources, and, in connection therewith, requiring a feasibility study for the use of small modular nuclear reactors as a source of carbon-free energy and for recycled energy, specifying the maximum nameplate capacity of a generation unit for pumped hydroelectricity.
Summary

The bill requires the director of the office of economic

development (office) or the director's designee to conduct or cause to be
conducted a study (feasibility study) regarding the feasibility of using
small modular nuclear reactors as a carbon-free energy source for the
state and includes specific items that must be included in the feasibility
study.
By July 1, 2024, the director of the office is required to provide a
written report to the committees of the senate and house of
representatives having jurisdiction over energy matters regarding the
findings and conclusions from the feasibility study. The bill appropriates
$500,000 from the general fund to the office for the 2022-23 fiscal year
to be used for the purposes of the feasibility study.
In addition, current law defines recycled energy as energy
produced by a generation unit with a nameplate capacity of not more than
15 megawatts. For pumped hydroelectricity generation only, the bill
specifies that the energy be produced by a generation unit with a
nameplate capacity of not more than 400 megawatts.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/31/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
B. Rankin (R)
House:
H. McKean (R)
StatusSenate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely (02/17/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-080
Title: Wildland Fire Investigations
DescriptionConcerning a duty of the division of fire prevention and control to conduct wildland fire investigations, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill establishes that conducting investigations of wildland fires
in the state is a duty of the division of fire prevention and control within
the department of public safety and makes an appropriation to fund such
investigations.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (06/13/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
K. Donovan (D)
House:
D. Roberts (D)
StatusHouse Committee on Appropriations Lay Over Unamended - Amendment(s) Failed (05/12/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-082
Title: Geographical Area Hazardous Air Pollution Rule
DescriptionConcerning addressing the geographical areas with the greatest concentration of air pollutants that affect human health.
Summary

The bill requires the division of administration in the department
of public health and environment to analyze data published by the United
States environmental protection agency. The purpose of this analysis is
to identify geographical areas in which hazardous air pollutants have the
greatest negative effects on human health and then to propose a rule to the

air quality control commission to address these areas. The commission
will consider the rule at a hearing.
The division will also create and publish a map showing areas
where hazardous air pollutants have the greatest potential for causing
chronic human health effects.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/31/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
K. Donovan (D)
House:
StatusSenate Committee on Health & Human Services Postpone Indefinitely (02/16/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-118
Title: Encourage Geothermal Energy Use
DescriptionConcerning the encouragement of the use of geothermal energy by providing similar treatment to solar energy, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill modifies the following statutory provisions that apply to
solar energy so that they also apply to geothermal energy, which generally
is using the heat of the earth to generate electricity or to heat or cool
space or water:
  • Section 1 of the bill requires the Colorado energy office
(office) to develop basic consumer education and guidance

about leased or purchased geothermal installation, in
consultation with industries that offer these options to
consumers;
  • Sections 2, 6, and 8 limit the aggregate of all charges or
other related or associated fees the state, a county, or a
municipality may impose or assess to install a geothermal
energy system;
  • Section 3 specifies that geothermal equipment is a type of
pollution control equipment that the division of
administration in the department of public health and
environment may certify as pollution control equipment;
  • Section 4 specifies that a project for purposes of the
County and Municipality Development Revenue Bond
Act includes capital improvements to existing
single-family residential, multi-family residential,
commercial, or industrial structures, to retrofit such
structures for installation of geothermal improvements;
  • Section 5 permits a county board of commissioners or a
regional planning commission, and section 9 requires a
municipal development commission, to include methods
for assuring access to appropriate conditions for
geothermal energy sources in a master plan for
development;
  • Section 7 specifies that the addition of a geothermal energy
device to a building is not necessarily considered a
structural alteration for purposes of continuing a
nonconforming use of a building, structure, or land under
a county zoning resolution;
  • Section 10 permits the Colorado agricultural value-added
development board to use some of the money in the
agriculture value-added cash fund for geothermal energy
generation facilities that are colocated with agricultural
uses;
  • Section 11 adds a geothermal energy device to the types of
renewable energy generation devices that cannot be
prohibited in legal instruments related to the transfer or sale
of, or interest in, real property;
  • Section 13 includes an independently owned geothermal
energy system, which is defined in section 12, in the
property tax exemption for household furnishings;
  • Section 14 creates community geothermal gardens, which
are analogous to community solar gardens; and
  • Sections 15 and 16 create conforming amendments to the
definition of qualified community location to incorporate
community geothermal gardens for purposes of local
improvement districts and municipal special improvement
districts.
Section 1 requires the office to update the greenhouse gas
pollution reduction roadmap to expressly include geothermal energy as
a renewable energy resource that qualifying retail utilities may use to
achieve the electric utility sector greenhouse gas pollution reduction goals
set forth in the roadmap.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/06/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Woodward (R)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House:
D. Valdez (D)
R. Holtorf (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/03/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-138
Title: Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions In Colorado
DescriptionConcerning measures to promote reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

Section 1 of the bill requires each insurance company issued a
certificate of authority to transact insurance business to prepare and file
an annual report with the insurance commissioner providing a
climate-risk assessment for the insurance company's investment portfolio
from the previous 12 months. The commissioner of insurance is required
to post the reports on the division of insurance's website. Section 1

defines climate-risk assessment as a determination of the economic and
business risks that climate change poses to an investment.
Section 2 requires the board of trustees of the public employees'
retirement association (PERA board) to prepare a similar annual report
and post it on the PERA board's website.
Section 3 updates the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) emission
reduction goals to add a 40% reduction goal for 2028 compared to 2005
GHG pollution levels and a 75% reduction goal for 2040 compared to
2005 GHG pollution levels.
Section 4 defines a small off-road engine as a gasoline-powered
engine of 50 horsepower or less used to fuel small off-road equipment
like lawn mowers and leaf blowers. Section 4 phases out the use of small
off-road engines by prohibiting their sale in nonattainment areas of the
state on or after January 1, 2030, and by providing financial incentives to
promote the replacement of small off-road engines with electric-powered,
small off-road equipment before 2030.
Section 11 establishes a state income tax credit in an amount equal
to 30% of the purchase price for new, electric-powered, small off-road
equipment for purchases made in income tax years 2023 through 2029.
Section 6 gives the oil and gas conservation commission authority
over class VI injection wells used for sequestration of GHG, including
through the issuance and enforcement of permits.
Section 7 requires the commissioner of agriculture or the
commissioner's designee, in consultation with the Colorado energy office
and the air quality control commission, to conduct a study examining
carbon reduction and sequestration opportunities in the agricultural sector
in the state, including the potential development of certified carbon offset
programs or credit instruments. On or before December 15, 2022, the
commissioner of agriculture or the commissioner's designee is required
to submit a report summarizing the study, including any legislative
recommendations, to the general assembly.
In support of the use of agrivoltaics, which is the colocation of
solar energy generation facilities on a parcel of land with agricultural
activities, section 8 authorizes the Colorado agriculture value-added
development board (board) to provide financing, including grants or
loans, for agricultural research on the use of agrivoltaics. For a research
project for which the board awards money to study the use of agrivoltaics,
sections 5 and 8 require the director of the division of parks and wildlife
to consult on the research project regarding the wildlife impacts of
agrivoltaic use.
Section 9 authorizes the board to seek, accept, and expend gifts,
grants, and donations, including donations of in-kind resources such as
solar panels, for use in agricultural research projects. Section 9 also
updates the statutory definition of agrivoltaics to list additional
agricultural activities on the parcel of land on which solar panel
generation facilities may be colocated, including animal husbandry, cover
cropping for soil health, and carbon sequestration.
Section 10 amends the statutory definition of solar energy
facility used in determining the valuation of public utilities for property
tax purposes to include agrivoltaics.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/09/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
K. Priola (R)
C. Hansen (D)
House:
A. Valdez (D)
K. McCormick (D)
StatusHouse Second Reading Special Order - Laid Over Daily - No Amendments (05/09/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-179
Title: Deter Tampering Motor Vehicle Emission Control System
DescriptionConcerning measures to address tampering with a motor vehicle's emission control system.
Summary

Section 5 of the bill prohibits a person, on or after March 1, 2023,
from tampering with a motor vehicle's emission control system,
conveying or offering to convey a motor vehicle with an emission control
system that has been tampered with, or operating a motor vehicle with an
emission control system that has been tampered with (anti-tampering
provisions).

Section 5 also:
  • Provides a safe harbor from enforcement of the
anti-tampering provisions for a period up to one year for a
person that self-reports noncompliance with the
anti-tampering provisions;
  • Authorizes the air quality control commission to adopt
rules as necessary to implement the anti-tampering
provisions;
  • Exempts motorcycles from the anti-tampering provisions;
and
  • Requires the department of public health and environment,
on or before January 1, 2024, and on or before January 1 of
each year thereafter, to report to the committees that hear
energy matters a summary of the complaints filed,
enforcement actions taken, and penalties assessed for
violations of the anti-tampering provisions.
Section 1 authorizes the attorney general to bring a civil action to
enforce the anti-tampering provisions, and sections 3 and 4 establish
penalties for the anti-tampering provisions. Section 3 requires penalties
collected to be credited to the catalytic converter identification and theft
prevention grant program cash fund (fund), which fund is created in
section 2 and is to be used for the catalytic converter identification and
theft prevention grant program created in House Bill 22-1217, if that bill
becomes law. Sections 2 and 3 take effect only if House Bill 22-1217
becomes law. Alternatively, if House Bill 22-1217 does not become law,
section 4 requires penalties collected to be credited to the AIR account in
the highway users tax fund for the administration of the automobile
inspection and readjustment program. Section 4 takes effect only if
House Bill 22-1217 does not become law.
Section 6 makes nonsubstantive changes to the definition of
motor vehicle.
Section 7 extends the period during which a motor vehicle dealer
remains liable to a consumer for a recently purchased motor vehicle's
compliance with emissions standards from 3 business days after purchase
to 7 business days after purchase.
Section 8 authorizes the department of revenue to deny, suspend,
or revoke a motor vehicle dealer's, wholesale motor vehicle auction
dealer's, wholesaler's, buyer agent's, or used motor vehicle dealer's license
for selling to a retail customer a motor vehicle that is not equipped with
a properly functioning emission control system.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/05/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
L. Liston (R)
J. Ginal (D)
House:
S. Lontine (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/08/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-180
Title: Programs To Reduce Ozone Through Increased Transit
DescriptionConcerning programs to reduce ground level ozone through increased use of transit.
Summary

The bill creates the ozone season transit grant program (program)
in the Colorado energy office (office). The program provides grants to the
regional transportation district (RTD) and transit associations in order to
provide free transit services for at least 30 days during ozone season. A
transit association receiving a grant may use the money to make grants to
eligible transit agencies. The eligible transit agencies may use the money

to provide at least 30 days of new or expanded free transit services during
ozone season. The RTD may use grant money to cover up to 80% of the
costs of providing free transit for at least 30 days on all services offered
by the RTD during ozone season. Eligible transit agencies and the RTD
can use the money to cover lost fare box revenues and to pay for other
expenses necessary to implement the program, including expenses
associated with an increase in ridership as a result of the program. The
RTD and a transportation association receiving a grant are required to
report to the office on the services offered and estimates of the change in
ridership as a result of the program.
The office is required to establish policies governing the program
and to report to the house and senate transportation committees by
December 31 of each year of the program. The program is repealed,
effective July 1, 2024.
The transit and rail division (division) in the department of
transportation is required to create a 3-year pilot project to extend
state-run transit services throughout the state with the goals of reducing
ground level ozone, increasing ridership, and reducing vehicle miles
traveled in the state. The division is required to report to the
transportation legislation review committee on the pilot project. The pilot
project is repealed, effective July 1, 2026.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/02/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House:
M. Gray (D)
J. Bacon (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (05/26/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-193
Title: Air Quality Improvement Investments
DescriptionConcerning measures to improve air quality in the state, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

Industrial and manufacturing operations clean air grant
program. Section 1 of the bill creates the industrial and manufacturing
operations clean air grant program (clean air grant program) through
which the Colorado energy office (office) awards grant money to private
entities, local governments, and public-private partnerships for voluntary
projects to reduce air pollutants from industrial and manufacturing

operations.
Voluntary projects eligible for grant money include:
  • Energy efficiency projects;
  • Renewable energy projects;
  • Beneficial electrification projects;
  • Transportation electrification projects;
  • Projects producing or utilizing clean hydrogen;
  • Projects involving carbon capture at industrial facilities;
  • Methane capture projects;
  • Projects producing or utilizing sustainable aviation fuel;
and
  • Industrial process changes that reduce emissions.
Starting in 2025, the office is required to report annually on the
progress of the clean air grant program, submit the report to the
legislative committees with jurisdiction over energy matters, and post the
reports on the office's website.
On June 30, 2022, the state treasurer shall transfer $25 million
from the general fund to the industrial and manufacturing operations
clean air grant program cash fund, which fund is created in the bill. The
fund may also consist of money from federal sources and from gifts,
grants, and donations. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated
to the office for its administration of the clean air grant program.
The clean air grant program is repealed on September 1, 2029.
Community access to electric bicycles. Section 2 creates the
community access to electric bicycles grant program (electric bicycles
grant program) through which the office awards grant money to local
governments and nonprofit organizations that administer or plan to
administer a bike share program or an ownership program for the
provision of electric bicycles in a community. Section 2 also creates the
community access to electric bicycles rebate program (rebate program)
through which the office provides individuals in low- and
moderate-income households, or bicycle shops that sell electric bicycles
to program participants at discounted prices, rebates for purchases of
electric bicycles used for commuting purposes.
Starting in 2025, the office is required to report annually on the
progress of the electric bicycles grant program and the rebate program,
submit copies of the report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction
over transportation matters, and post the report on the office's website.
On June 30, 2022, the state treasurer shall transfer $12 million
from the general fund to the community access to electric bicycles cash
fund, which fund is created in the bill. The fund may also consist of
money from federal sources and from gifts, grants, and donations. The
money in the fund is subject to annual appropriation by the general
assembly to the office for its administration of the electric bicycles grant
program and the rebate program.
The electric bicycles grant program and the rebate program are
repealed on September 1, 2028.
Diesel truck emissions reduction grant program. Section 3
creates the diesel truck emissions reduction grant program (diesel trucks
grant program) through which the division of administration (division) in
the department of public health and environment (department) awards
grant money to certain private and public entities for decommissioning
diesel trucks and replacing the trucks with newer model trucks. The
division is required to determine eligibility for the grant money and the
eligible fuel types for qualifying as a replacement vehicle under the diesel
trucks grant program.
Starting in 2023, the department is required to report annually on
the progress of the diesel trucks grant program and submit a copy of the
report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over energy matters.
On June 30, 2022, the state treasurer shall transfer $15 million
from the general fund to the diesel truck emissions reduction grant
program cash fund, which fund is created in the bill. The fund may also
consist of money from federal sources and from gifts, grants, and
donations. The money in the fund is subject to annual appropriation by
the general assembly to the department for use by the division for its
administration of the diesel trucks grant program.
The diesel trucks grant program is repealed on July 1, 2032.
Electrifying school buses grant program. Section 3 also creates
the electrifying school buses grant program (school buses grant program)
through which the department, with technical assistance from the office,
awards grant money to school districts and charter schools to help finance
the purchase and maintenance of electric-powered school buses, the
conversion of fossil-fuel-powered school buses to electric-powered
school buses, charging infrastructure, and upgrades for electric charging
infrastructure and the retirement of fossil-fuel-powered school buses.
Starting in 2025, and every odd-numbered year thereafter, the
department is required to report on the progress of the school buses grant
program, submit copies of the report to the legislative committees with
jurisdiction over education and transportation matters, and post copies of
the report on its website.
On June 30, 2022, the state treasurer shall transfer $65 million
from the general fund to the electrifying school buses grant program cash
fund, which fund is created in the bill. The fund may also consist of
money from federal sources and from gifts, grants, and donations. The
money in the fund is subject to annual appropriation by the general
assembly to the department for its administration of the school buses
grant program.
The school buses grant program is repealed on September 1, 2034.
Section 4 updates the definition of federal act regarding the
reference to the federal Clean Air Act. Section 4 also updates the
definition of issue with respect to an order, permit, determination, or
notice issued by the division, to remove certified mail and add electronic
mail as options to issue such order, permit, determination, or notice.
Section 5 clarifies that the statutory fee caps for fees collected by
the air quality enterprise apply only to the annual stationary source
emission fees. The statutory fee caps are $1 million for state fiscal year
2021-22, $3 million for state fiscal year 2022-23, $4 million for state
fiscal year 2023-24, and $5 million on and after July 1, 2024.
Section 6 removes the requirement that the division make the
forms on which a person provides details necessary for filing an air
pollution emission notice available at all of the air pollution control
authority offices.
Section 7 extends the time within which the commission must
grant or deny a request for a hearing from within 15 days after the request
was made to within 30 days after the request was made.
Existing law authorizes the commission to submit any additions or
changes to the state implementation plan (SIP) to the administrator of the
federal environmental protection agency (administrator) for conditional
or temporary approval pending legislative council review of the additions
or changes. Section 8 authorizes the commission to submit the changes
or additions to the administrator as a provisional submission, pending
possible introduction and enactment of a bill to modify or delete all or a
portion of the commission's additions or changes to the SIP.
Section 9 makes a conforming amendment.
Section 10 appropriates the money transferred from the general
fund to the cash funds created in sections 1, 2, and 3 to the office, the
division, and the department for their administration of the programs
described in sections 1, 2, and 3. Additionally, section 10 appropriates
from the general fund:
  • $750,000 to the department of personnel for the costs of
issuing free annual eco passes to state employees; and
  • $7,000,000 to the department of public health and
environment to finance the aerial surveying of pollutants.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/05/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
S. Fenberg (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
House:
M. Froelich (D)
A. Valdez (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-198
Title: Orphaned Oil And Gas Wells Enterprise
DescriptionConcerning measures to address orphaned wells in Colorado, and, in connection therewith, creating the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise.
Summary

The bill creates the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise
(enterprise) in the department of natural resources for the purpose of:
  • Plugging, reclaiming, and remediating orphaned wells
located in the state for which no owner or operator can be
found or for which the owner or operator is unwilling or

unable to pay the costs of plugging and abandoning the
well;
  • Ensuring that the costs associated with the plugging,
reclaiming, and remediating of orphaned wells are borne by
operators in the form of mitigation fees;
  • Determining the amounts of mitigation fees; and
  • Imposing and collecting mitigation fees.
On or before August 1, 2022; on or before April 30, 2023; and on
or before April 30 each year thereafter, each operator shall pay a
mitigation fee to the enterprise for each well that has been spud but is not
yet plugged and abandoned, in accordance with rules promulgated by the
Colorado oil and gas conservation commission (commission), in the
following amounts:
  • For operators with production that is equal to or less than
a threshold to be determined by rules of the commission,
$125 for each well; or
  • For operators with production that exceeds a threshold to
be determined by rules of the commission, $225 for each
well.
Money collected as mitigation fees is credited to the orphaned
wells mitigation enterprise cash fund (fund), which is created in the bill.
The bill also creates the orphaned wells mitigation enterprise board
(enterprise board) and requires the enterprise board to administer the
enterprise and, at least annually, to:
  • Consider whether the mitigation fee amounts should be
increased or reduced, based on current circumstances and
reasonably anticipated future expenditures from the fund;
  • If the enterprise board determines that an increase or
reduction of the mitigation fee amounts is warranted, adjust
the mitigation fee amounts; and
  • Advise the commission of the outcome of the enterprise
board's deliberations.
The commission may promulgate rules as necessary to implement
the enterprise.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/18/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Scott (R)
S. Fenberg (D)
House:
M. Weissman (D)
P. Will (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/02/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-200
Title: Rural Provider Stimulus Grant Program
DescriptionConcerning a grant program to improve access to health care in rural communities.
Summary

The bill establishes the rural provider access and affordability
stimulus grant program (grant program) in the Colorado department of
health care policy and financing (state department). As part of the grant
program, the state department may award grants for projects that
modernize the affordability solutions and the information technology of
health-care providers in rural communities (rural providers) and projects

that expand access to health care in rural communities. The types of rural
providers eligible for grants under the grant program are rural hospitals
that have a lower net patient revenue or fund balance than other rural
hospitals in the state, as determined by the medical services board (state
board) by rule.
On or before December 31, 2022:
  • The state department must adopt guidelines for the grant
program (guidelines); and
  • The state board must adopt rules as necessary for the
administration of the grant program (rules).
The bill creates the rural provider access and affordability advisory
committee (advisory committee) in the state department. The advisory
committee is required to advise the state department on the administration
of the grant program, the adoption of the guidelines, and the selection of
grant recipients. The advisory committee is also required to advise on the
rules.
The bill also creates the rural provider access and affordability
fund (fund) in the state treasury. The bill requires the state treasurer to
transfer $10,000,000 from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to
the fund for awarding grants under the grant program and the
administration of the grant program.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/18/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Ginal (D)
B. Rankin (R)
House:
J. McCluskie (D)
M. Soper (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/01/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-210
Title: License Supplemental Health-care Staffing Agencies
DescriptionConcerning the regulation of supplemental health-care staffing agencies by the department of public health and environment, and, in connection therewith, requiring supplemental health-care staffing agencies to report data to the department of labor and employment, and requiring the department of public health and environment to analyze information provided by supplemental health-care staffing agencies to determine the need for regulation of staffing agencies and making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill requires the department of public health and environment
(department) to license supplemental health-care staffing agencies
(staffing agencies) that employ nurses, nurse aids, physical and
occupational therapists, and physical therapist and occupational therapy
assistants (health-care workers). A staffing agency is defined as an entity

that employs health-care workers and, for a fee, assigns them to
temporary placements in nursing care facilities or assisted living
residences (health-care facilities) on a temporary basis for a fee. The bill
differentiates a staffing agency from a health-care worker platform where
health-care workers can be listed for hire by a health-care facility.
The bill includes qualifications for a license; criteria for applying
for a license and the related fee; and provisions for the issuance, renewal,
suspension, or revocation of the license.
On and after April 1, 2023, a person operating an unlicensed
staffing agency is guilty of a civil infraction and is subject to a fine and
may be subject to civil penalties.
The bill specifies minimum standards for staffing agencies as
established by the state board of health (state board) by rule. In part, the
minimum standards:
  • Require that a staffing agency maintain professional
liability insurance, workers' compensation insurance, and
a surety bond; and
  • Prohibit a staffing agency from restricting employment
opportunities of its health-care worker employees,
including a prohibition against requiring liquidated
damages, employment fees, or other compensation from
health-care workers, if the staffing agency employee is
hired as a permanent employee by the health-care facility.
A staffing agency shall check the credentials of health-care worker
employees and require a background check and a check of the Colorado
adult protective services (CAPS) database for employees.
The bill requires each staffing agency to report quarterly to the
department concerning the average amount charged for services to
health-care facilities and the average amount paid for those services. A
staffing agency that fails to report is subject to civil fines and suspension
or nonrenewal of its license.
By December 31, 2023, the department shall submit a report to
certain committees of the general assembly and to the governor
concerning the department's recommendations for caps or other
limitations on service rates and amounts charged to health-care facilities
for services provided by a staffing agency's health-care workers. In
formulating its recommendations, the department shall conduct a
stakeholder process with affected providers and agencies.
The bill requires the department to maintain a current list of
licensed staffing agencies and make the list publicly available on the
department's website.
The bill creates a cash fund for licensing fees and penalties.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/05/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
J. Cooke (R)
House:
S. Lontine (D)
M. Soper (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/03/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-225
Title: Ambulance Service Sustainability And State Licensing
DescriptionConcerning emergency medical services in the state, and, in connection therewith, creating an emergency medical services system sustainability task force and requiring ambulance services to obtain a state license from the department of public health and environment and making an appropriation.
Summary

Under current law, ambulance services are regulated at the local
level. On and after July 1, 2024, the bill requires an ambulance service to

obtain a state license from the department of public health and
environment (department). In licensing ambulance services, the
department is authorized to conduct inspections, investigate and hold
hearings regarding alleged violations, and, for any violations found, take
action against an ambulance service's license or application for an initial
or renewed license, impose civil penalties, or both.
On or before January 1, 2024, the state board of health (board) is
required to adopt rules regarding minimum standards for ambulance
services, including equipment, staffing, medical oversight, and general
and vehicle liability insurance standards and, if the board deems it
necessary, rules imposing application and licensing fees.
On and after July 1, 2024, a county or city and county is authorized
to grant an ambulance service authorization to operate within the county's
or city and county's jurisdiction and to enter into service agreements and
other contracts with ambulance services operating in the county's or city
and county's jurisdiction.
The bill also creates a statewide task force to make statutory, rule,
and policy recommendations for how to preserve, promote, and expand
consumer access to emergency medical services in the state, including
recommendations:
  • Regarding the regulation of ambulance service;
  • To address inequities and disparities in access to
emergency medical services;
  • To address workforce recruiting and retention issues;
  • To promote the financial sustainability of emergency
medical services; and
  • Regarding the long-term sustainability of emergency
medical services.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/05/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
L. Liston (R)
R. Zenzinger (D)
House:
D. Roberts (D)
M. Baisley (R)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/01/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-226
Title: Programs To Support Health-care Workforce
DescriptionConcerning measures to support the health-care workforce, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
Summary

The bill creates the health-care workforce resilience and retention
program (program) using existing initiatives to ensure that Colorado's
health-care workforce is adequately supported in order to meet the
health-care demands of Coloradans and to support the resilience,
well-being, and retention of health-care workers. The program is
authorized to seek and expend gifts, grants, and donations to support the
program. The program is exempt from the procurement code. The bill

appropriates $2 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund
for the program.
The bill creates the practice-based health education grant program
(grant program) to increase practice-based training opportunities
necessary for health profession students enrolled in accredited Colorado
schools to complete degree requirements and become licensed to practice.
The primary care office in the department of public health and
environment administers the grant program and shall conduct a
stakeholder engagement process to determine key operational components
of the grant program policies and procedures. The bill appropriates $20
million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund for the grant
program.
The bill directs the state board of community colleges and
occupational education (board) to administer the in-demand short-term
health-care credentials program in order to support the expansion of
available health-care professionals. The bill appropriates $26 million
from the economic recovery and relief cash fund for these programs. The
board shall allocate funds to community colleges, area technical colleges,
local district colleges, and community not-for-profit organizations that
deliver hybrid programming that leverages place-based supports in
partnership with online accredited university programs through
reimbursement based on students enrolled in eligible programs for fiscal
years 2022-23 to 2025-26 to:
  • Provide assistance for tuition, fees, and course materials for
eligible programs;
  • Support alignment with existing efforts, such as
apprenticeship and work-based learning, for students to
earn eligible program credentials that lead into health-care
careers such as nursing; and
  • If unexpended resources exist or if the program use is less
than anticipated, to expand eligible programs in allied
health based on in-demand credential needs or include high
school equivalency support and attainment for students
without a high school degree who participate in the
program.
The bill requires the primary care office and the governor's office
of information technology to work through the government data advisory
board to determine data-sharing agreements that integrate data collected
by the state under existing authorities that may inform the analysis of
need, allocation of resources, and evaluation of performance of
state-administered or state-financed health workforce planning or
development initiatives.
Under current law, a nurse who holds a volunteer nurse license
cannot get paid for nursing tasks. The bill removes this limitation.
The bill directs the nurse-physician advisory task force for
Colorado health care to make recommendations on:
  • Alignment of health-care licensing with federal statutory
minimums;
  • Identification of unnecessary regulatory burdens or
barriers;
  • Regulatory reforms that support health-care licensees to
work at their full scope of practice; and
  • Feasibility of temporary candidate licenses for students
nearing the completion of an accredited health-care
program.
The bill makes the following changes and additions to the school
nurse grant program:
  • Repeals the requirement of a 5-year grant cycle;
  • Requires that the grant supplement, not supplant, funding
for school nurse positions existing in the local education
provider's most recent fiscal year prior to applying for a
grant;
  • Directs the department of public health and environment to
annually award grants; and
  • Appropriates $3 million to the department of public health
and environment for the grant program from the economic
recovery and relief cash fund.
The bill appropriates $10 million from the economic recovery and
relief cash fund to the department of public health and environment. The
department shall use this appropriation for recruitment and re-engagement
efforts of workers in the health-care profession with current or expired
licenses and staffing.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/25/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
B. Rankin (R)
S. Jaquez Lewis (D)
House:
K. Mullica (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (05/18/2022)
Position

Bill: SB22-236
Title: Review Of Medicaid Provider Rates
DescriptionConcerning the review of medicaid provider rates.
Summary

Joint Budget Committee. Current law requires the department of
health care policy and financing (state department) to establish a schedule
for a review of provider rates paid under medicaid so that each provider
rate is reviewed at least every 5 years and to provide the schedule to the
joint budget committee (JBC). Beginning August 1, 2023, the bill
requires the state department to establish a schedule so that each provider
rate is reviewed at least every 3 years and to provide the schedule to the
medicaid provider rate review advisory committee (advisory committee)

in addition to the JBC.
Current law authorizes the advisory committee or the JBC, by a
majority vote, to direct the state department to conduct a review of a
provider rate that is not scheduled for review during that year. Effective
August 1, 2023, if the state department determines the request for an
out-of-cycle review cannot be conducted, the bill requires the state
department to provide written notification to the advisory committee and
the JBC within 30 days after the request is made stating the reasons the
out-of-cycle request cannot be conducted.
Effective August 1, 2023, the bill requires the state department to
utilize information made available by the state department concerning the
prior authorization process and billing structure for provider rates if such
information is relevant to the review in order to minimize rate disparities
for services in professional classifications that are eligible for
reimbursement under medicaid.
Effective August 1, 2023, the bill requires the state department to
conduct a public meeting at least quarterly to inform the state
department's review of provider rates.
Current law requires the advisory committee consist of 24
members. Effective August 1, 2023, the bill decreases the advisory
committee to 7 members and requires the members to have proven
expertise related to medicaid in one or more specific areas. The advisory
committee is currently scheduled to sunset September 1, 2025. The bill
moves the sunset to September 1, 2036.
On or before December 1, 2024, and each December 1 thereafter,
the bill requires the advisory committee to present to the JBC an overview
of the provider rate review process, a summary of the provider rates that
were reviewed, and the strategies for responding to the findings of the
provider rate review.

Full TextFull Text of Bill
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/30/2022)
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
B. Rankin (R)
C. Hansen (D)
House:
K. Ransom (R)
J. McCluskie (D)
StatusGovernor Signed (06/07/2022)
Position
back to top
 
border   border
 
Copyright © 2008-2022 State Capitol Watch