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based on: Profile: LWVCO - Housing

 
 
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LAC Lobbyists: Kathy Smith, Jo Feder, Trish Warner


Bill: HB22-1051
Title: Mod Affordable Housing Tax Credit
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/13/2022
DescriptionConcerning modification of the Colorado affordable housing tax credit, and, in connection therewith, extending the time during which the credit may be claimed and increasing the yearly amount of credits that can be allocated.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
D. Hisey (R)
House:
H. McKean (R)
S. Bird (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/04/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

The Colorado Affordable Housing Tax Credit Program was created in 2001 and is administered by the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA). This program raises private sector equity needed to support the development and preservation of affordable rental housing. Tax credits are very important in financing affordable housing and have led to the creation of thousands of units of affordable housing throughout Colorado. Demand is high for these tax credits. Currently, CHFA may allocate income tax credits in an annual aggregate amount of up to $10M. HB22-1051, a bipartisan bill, increases the annual aggregate cap to $15M beginning in 2023 and extends the time period through 2034. These tax credits decrease state revenue but do not require an appropriation. 

The League supports policies to provide a decent home and a suitable living environment for every American family. The League supported HB19-1228, which increased the tax credit annual aggregate cap from $5M to $10M. Across Colorado, there is a severe shortage of affordable rentals. One quarter of Colorado’s rental households are severely cost burdened, spending more than half of their income on housing. Severely cost burdened households are more likely than other renters to sacrifice necessities, such as healthy food and healthcare, to pay the rent and to experience unstable housing situations. 

Summary

The Colorado housing and finance authority (CHFA), under the
Colorado affordable tax credit program, may allocate income tax credits

in an annual aggregate amount of up to $10 million for the years
beginning on January 1, 2020, and ending on December 31, 2024. The
bill extends this period to December 31, 2034, and increases the annual
aggregate cap for the years beginning on January 1, 2023, and ending on
December 31, 2034, to $15 million.

House SponsorsH. McKean (R)
S. Bird (D)
Senate SponsorsR. Zenzinger (D)
D. Hisey (R)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeFinance
StatusSenate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/09/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1056
Title: Emergency Temporary Care For Children
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/13/2022
DescriptionConcerning emergency temporary care for children, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Children & Domestic Matters
- Crimes, Corrections, & Enforcement
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
D. Moreno (D)
House:
D. Michaelson Jenet (D)
S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (03/08/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

At hearing in the House Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services on 2/15 was moved to Appropriations as amended.  The amendment only strengthened the bill but did not change the intent.

Summary

The bill permits county departments of human or social services
(county departments) to enter into an agreement with one or more
facilities to provide emergency temporary shelter to children who are
neglected and dependent, who are taken into temporary custody, or who
have had contact with law enforcement and are unable to return home.
Emergency temporary shelter is described in the bill as the temporary

care of a child in a physically unrestricted setting for no more than 5 days,
pending a return to the child's home or placement in an alternate setting.
Receiving temporary care in emergency temporary shelter is voluntary,
and a child may leave emergency temporary shelter at any time.
A county department may contract with any of the following
facilities to provide emergency temporary shelter in the county: Group
care facilities and homes or a foster care home, homeless youth shelter,
residential child care facility, respite child care center, specialized group
facility, or any other licensed or certified 24-hour nonsecure care and
treatment facility away from the child's parent or guardian. A county can
enter into agreements with more than one facility, and 2 or more counties
may jointly enter into an agreement with a facility.
The bill requires the general assembly to appropriate money to the
state department of human services (state department) for emergency
temporary shelter services. The state department allocates the money to
a county after approving the county's emergency temporary shelter plan.

House SponsorsD. Michaelson Jenet (D)
S. Gonzales-Gutierrez (D)
Senate SponsorsD. Moreno (D)
House CommitteePublic and Behavioral Health & Human Services
Senate CommitteeHealth and Human Services
StatusSenate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/05/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1082
Title: Establish Fair Housing Unit Department Of Law
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/19/2022
DescriptionConcerning the enforcement of state housing laws by the department of law, and, in connection therewith, establishing a fair housing unit within the department of law.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
- State Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Gonzales (D)
House:
E. Hooton (D)
J. Bacon (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/06/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill creates The Fair Housing Unit within the Department of Law (DOL) and expands the list of state laws for which the Attorney General may bring civil and criminal enforcement actions. The additional laws include: 

Immigrant Tenant Protection Act 

Mobile Home Park Act 

Mobile Home Park Act Dispute Resolution and Enforcement Program 

Security Deposits – Wrongful Withholding 

Notice of Rent Increase 

The DOL requires 2 FTE to staff the new Fair Housing Unit and to enforce the housing laws. Funds in the Mortgage Fraud Settlement Custodial Cash Fund will be appropriated for these costs. 

The League supports policies to provide a decent home and a suitable living environment for every American family. Adequate enforcement of existing housing laws is essential to providing a decent home for every Coloradan. A Fair Housing Unit within Colorado’s Department of Law will help protect the housing rights of Coloradans and ensure fair treatment under the law for all persons. 

Summary

The bill:
  • Expands the statutory list of state laws for which the
attorney general may bring civil and criminal enforcement

actions to include various statutory provisions relating to
housing; and
  • Creates the fair housing unit within the department of law.

House SponsorsE. Hooton (D)
J. Bacon (D)
Senate SponsorsJ. Gonzales (D)
House CommitteeJudiciary
Senate CommitteeJudiciary
StatusSigned by the Speaker of the House (05/14/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1083
Title: Colorado Homeless Contribution Income Tax Credit
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/19/2022
DescriptionConcerning the creation of the Colorado homeless contribution income tax credit, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
C. Simpson (R)
House:
K. Tipper (D)
J. Rich (R)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/21/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill repeals an existing income tax credit available to taxpayers who make contributions to enterprise zone administrators to promote temporary, emergency, or transitional housing programs for people experiencing homelessness and replace that income tax credit with one that is available in the entire state.  Instead of having the enterprise zone administrators and the office of economic development manage the credit, the bill places that responsibility on the division of housing in the department of local affairs.
 

The bill also expands the scope so that a taxpayer may claim the tax credit when permissible contributions are made not only to an approved project, but also to approved nonprofit organizations providing certain qualifying activities.
 

The amount of the income tax credit remains the same for each contribution; except that, for contribution; except that, for contributions made in an underserved , rural county, the amount is 30% rather than 25%, and the new credit is capped at $750,000 in contributions for the nonprofit organization, and if the nonprofit organization also administers one or more approved projects, the new credit is capped at an additional $750,000 per project.  The new credit’s availability is limited to 8 years, and, in the same manner as the enterprise zone tax credit that is being repealed, any credit in excess of taxpayer/s liability for the income tax year for which the credit is claimed may be carried forward for up to 5 years.

At hearing  on 2/10 in House Finance Committee was referred  to Committee on Appropriations with favorable recommendation as amended.  The amendment only strengthened the bill but did not change the intent.

Summary

The bill repeals an existing income tax credit available to
taxpayers who make contributions to enterprise zone administrators to
promote temporary, emergency, or transitional housing programs for
people experiencing homelessness and replaces that income tax credit
with one that is available in the entire state. Instead of having the
enterprise zone administrators and the office of economic development

manage the credit, the bill places that responsibility on the division of
housing in the department of local affairs.
The bill also expands the scope so that a taxpayer may claim the
tax credit when permissible contributions are made not only to an
approved project, but also to approved nonprofit organizations providing
certain qualifying activities.
The amount of the income tax credit remains the same for each
contribution; except that, for contributions made in an underserved, rural
county, the amount is 30% rather than 25%, and the new credit is capped
at $750,000 in contributions for the nonprofit organization, and if the
nonprofit organization also administers one or more approved projects,
the new credit is capped at an additional $750,000 per project. The new
credit's availability is limited to 8 years, and, in the same manner as the
enterprise zone tax credit that is being repealed, any credit in excess of a
taxpayer's liability for the income tax year for which the credit is claimed
may be carried forward for up to 5 years.

House SponsorsK. Tipper (D)
J. Rich (R)
Senate SponsorsF. Winter (D)
C. Simpson (R)
House CommitteeFinance
Senate CommitteeFinance
StatusHouse Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1102
Title: Veterans And Military Status In Fair Housing
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/20/2022
DescriptionConcerning protected classes in fair housing practices, and, in connection therewith, including a veteran or military status as a protected class.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Gardner (R)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House:
T. Sullivan (D)
D. Ortiz (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/01/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

Current law does not provide any legal protections to Coloradans who are denied housing because of their veteran or military status. This bipartisan bill adds veteran or military status as a protected class under Colorado’s fair housing practices. 

The League supports policies to provide a decent home and a suitable living environment for every American family, and also supports programs and policies to prevent or reduce poverty and to promote self-sufficiency. Housing discrimination puts veterans at increased risk of housing instability, and at least 1 in 10 Coloradans experiencing homelessness has served in one of our nation's military branches. 

 

Summary

The bill forbids anyone selling or renting a dwelling from
discriminating against an individual based on their veteran or military
status. The bill forbids anyone from refusing to negotiate for housing with
an individual on the basis of their veteran or military status or otherwise
denying or withholding housing on the basis of an individual's veteran or

military status. For purposes of the bill, an individual who was
dishonorably discharged from military service does not have veteran or
military status.

House SponsorsT. Sullivan (D)
D. Ortiz (D)
Senate SponsorsR. Gardner (R)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House CommitteeState, Civic, Military and Veterans Affairs
Senate CommitteeJudiciary
StatusGovernor Signed (04/04/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1127
Title: Income Tax Deduction For Rent
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/21/2022
DescriptionConcerning the creation of an income tax deduction for rent paid.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:

House:
D. Woog (R)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (03/22/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Summary

The bill creates an income tax deduction of up to $17,500 for
tenants with taxable income under $40,000 for an individual or under
$80,000 for a head-of-household or a married couple for rent paid on a
rental residence in Colorado.

House SponsorsD. Woog (R)
Senate Sponsors
House CommitteeFinance
Senate Committee
StatusHouse Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely (03/24/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1137
Title: Homeowners' Association Board Accountability And Transparency
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date02/04/2022
DescriptionConcerning practices of unit owners' associations, and, in connection therewith, authorizing the enforcement of certain matters regarding unit owners' associations in small claims court and limiting the conduct of unit owners' associations in collecting unpaid assessments, fees, and fines.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Coleman (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
House:
N. Ricks (D)
M. Bradfield (R)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/14/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Summary

Section 1 of the bill authorizes a party in a matter concerning

rights and responsibilities arising under the declaration, bylaws,
covenants, or other governing documents of a unit owners' association
(HOA) to enforce those rights or responsibilities in small claims court if
the amount at issue does not exceed $7,500, exclusive of interest and
costs. The party may also seek declaratory relief in small claims court.
Section 2 specifies that the authority to enforce rights and responsibilities
in small claims court applies to an HOA's collection of fines from a unit
owner if the amount of fines, exclusive of interest and costs, does not
exceed $7,500.
Section 2 also requires an HOA that voluntarily conducts a reserve
study to also conduct a reconciliation of all of its reserve accounts at the
time of conducting the reserve study.
With regard to a unit owner's delinquency in paying HOA
assessments, section 2 also:
  • Requires an HOA to alert the unit owner regarding the
delinquency by, in addition to sending a notice of
delinquency to the unit owner as required by current law,
attempting to contact the unit owner by at least 2 other
methods of communication, including first-class or
certified mail, an e-mail, a telephone call or voice mail
message, or an in-person contact. The HOA must keep
records of its attempts to contact the unit owner regarding
the delinquency.
  • Prohibits an HOA, or a property management company
acting on behalf of an HOA, from referring the delinquent
account to a collection agency or attorney unless a majority
of the HOA's board of directors vote to refer the matter on
the record at a public hearing;
  • Prohibits an HOA from imposing late fees, fines, and
interest on a per-diem basis in an amount that exceeds the
lesser of $50 per day or $500 total;
  • Prohibits an HOA from assessing late fees and fines in an
amount or manner that renders the HOA dependent on the
late fees or fines for the purpose of generating revenue for
the HOA's general expenses;
  • Prohibits an HOA from charging a rate of interest on
unpaid assessments, fees, or fines in an amount greater than
8% per year;
  • Prohibits an HOA from assessing a fee or other charge for
providing the unit owner a statement of the total amount
that the unit owner owes the HOA;
  • Requires an HOA to adopt a policy to provide the unit
owner with contact information for one or more foreclosure
counseling services available in the county in which the
unit owner's common interest community is located; and
  • Before an HOA may initiate a foreclosure action against a
unit owner, requires that the HOA offer the unit owner a
repayment plan to pay the debt in monthly installments, and
the unit owner either declines the offer or, after accepting
the offer, fails to make at least 3 monthly payments.
Section 3 limits the interest rate that an HOA may apply to a unit
owner's past due assessment to an amount not to exceed 8% per year.
Section 4 limits the amount that an HOA is entitled to recover in
any action or suit that the HOA brings against a unit owner to an amount
equal to 3 times the amount of unpaid regular and special assessments
plus interest. Similarly, section 5 limits the maximum amount of
assessments and associated fees, late charges, attorney fees, fines, and
interest that an HOA may recover from the unit owner to 3 times the
amount of all unpaid regular and special assessments plus interest.

House SponsorsN. Ricks (D)
M. Bradfield (R)
Senate SponsorsJ. Coleman (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeJudiciary
StatusSenate Third Reading Reconsidered - No Amendments (05/02/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1223
Title: Mobile Home Property Tax Sale Notice And Exemption
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date02/10/2022
DescriptionConcerning property taxation of mobile homes, and, in connection therewith, creating an exemption for low-value mobile homes and modifying the notice requirements for mobile homes to be sold due to delinquent taxes and making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Local Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
D. Coram (R)
J. Ginal (D)
House:
J. Rich (R)
C. Kipp (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (03/17/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Summary

Section 1 of the bill creates a property tax exemption for mobile
homes that have an assessed value of $2,000 or less.

Section 2 eliminates the requirement that a county treasurer
publish a notice in a newspaper of a sale of a mobile home due to
property taxes owed if:
  • A distraint warrant has been delivered to the owner of the
mobile home or to his or her agent; and
  • The county treasurer publishes a notice of the sale on the
treasurer's website.

House SponsorsJ. Rich (R)
C. Kipp (D)
Senate SponsorsD. Coram (R)
J. Ginal (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeAppropriations
StatusSenate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1242
Title: Regulate Tiny Homes Manufacture Sale And Install
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date02/16/2022
DescriptionConcerning the regulation of structures that are manufactured at a location that is not at the site where the structure is occupied, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Business & Economic Development
- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Ginal (D)
D. Hisey (R)
House:
T. Exum Sr. (D)
C. Kipp (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (03/24/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

Current law regulates the manufacturers, sellers, and installers of manufactured homes.  This regulation includes requirements for vehement installation of manufactured homes, contract and disclosure requirements, and the registration, escrow, reimbursement, bonding, and inspections of the manufacturers, installers, and sellers.  In addition, the State housing board sets standards for the proper manufacture and installation of manufactured homes.  The board consults with an advisory committee when promulgating rules.

The bill adds tiny homes, which are typically manufactured, to this regulation on substantially similar terms.  This includes adding a representatives of the tiny home industry to the advisory committee.  The board is given the duty to regulate foundations for manufactured homes and factory built structures where no construction standards otherwise exist.  

In addition to adding tiny homes to these provisions, the bill addresses tiny home regulation in the following manner:
  * The board shall promulgate rules establishing specific standards for tiny homes.  When the national or international standard is created, the board may use that standard.  The board may modify these standards as necessary.
  *  The board shall establish standards for connecting a tiny home to utilities, including water, sewer, natural gas, and electricity;
  *. A local government may require the inspection of a tiny home manufactured before July 1, 2023, if the tiny home is not manufactured in accordance with the board’s standards;
   *. A State electrical inspector or a local government may approve the connection of a tiny home for electric utility service if the tiny home is in compliance with applicable codes and standards for connection for electric utility services; and
   *. A state plumbing inspector or a local government may approve the connection of a tiny home for water, gas, or sewer utility serviced if the tiny home is in compliance with applicable codes and standards for connection for water, gas, or sewer utility service.
   If a tiny home is approved for connection to utilities through the process described above, the tiny home may be connected to the appropriate utilities.  Current law governing the connection to each utility is amended to avoid conflicts with the process established in the bill. Selling or installing a tiny home without complying with the bill is declared a deceptive trade practice, which subjects a violator to damages in a lawsuit, a class 1 misdemeanor, and civil penalties of:
   * Up to $20,000 per violation;
   * Up to $10,000 for violating a court order or injunction; and
   * Up to $50,000 per violation if the victim is an elderly person.

Current law regulates mobile home parks, including notice requirements, lease termination limits and requirements, security deposit regulations, entry fee prohibitions, antitrust prohibitions, selling fee prohibitions, kickback prohibitions, retaliation prohibitions, regulation of how and if park rules are established, a right of first refusal when the owner wants to sell the mobile home park, a peaceful enjoyment right, and remedy provisions.  The bill includes tiny homes under these provisions.

Current law exempts manufactured homes from sales and use tax.  The bill adds tiny homes to this exemption.

At a hearing on 3/1 in the House Finance Committee was referred to the Committee on Appropriations with favorable recommendation as amended.  The amendment only strengthened the bill but did not change the intent.  
 

Summary

Current law regulates the manufacturers, sellers, and installers of
manufactured homes. This regulation includes requirements for the
installation of manufactured homes, contract and disclosure requirements,
and the registration, escrow, reimbursement, bonding, and inspections of
the manufacturers, installers, and sellers. In addition, the state housing

board (board) sets standards for the proper manufacture and installation
of manufactured homes. The board consults with an advisory committee
when promulgating rules.
The bill adds tiny homes, which are typically manufactured, to this
regulation on substantially similar terms. This includes adding 2
representatives of the tiny home industry to the advisory committee. The
board is given the duty to regulate foundations for manufactured homes
and factory-built structures where no construction standards otherwise
exist.
In addition to adding tiny homes to these provisions, the bill
addresses tiny home regulation in the following manner:
  • The board shall promulgate rules establishing specific
standards for tiny homes. When the national or
international standard is created, the board may use that
standard. The board may modify these standards as
necessary.
  • The board shall establish standards for connecting a tiny
home to utilities, including water, sewer, natural gas, and
electricity;
  • A local government may require the inspection of a tiny
home manufactured before July 1, 2023, if the tiny home is
not manufactured in accordance with the board's standards;
  • A state electrical inspector or a local government may
approve the connection of a tiny home for electric utility
service if the tiny home is in compliance with applicable
codes and standards for connection for electric utility
service; and
  • A state plumbing inspector or a local government may
approve the connection of a tiny home for water, gas, or
sewer utility service if the tiny home is in compliance with
applicable codes and standards for connection for water,
gas, or sewer utility service.
If a tiny home is approved for connection to utilities through the
process described above, the tiny home may be connected to the
appropriate utilities. Current law governing the connection to each utility
is amended to avoid conflicts with the process established in the bill.
Selling or installing a tiny home without complying with the bill
is declared a deceptive trade practice, which subjects a violator to
damages in a lawsuit, a class 1 misdemeanor, and civil penalties of:
  • Up to $20,000 per violation;
  • Up to $10,000 for violating a court order or injunction; and
  • Up to $50,000 per violation if the victim is an elderly
person.
Current law regulates mobile home parks, including notice
requirements, lease termination limits and requirements, security deposit
regulations, entry fee prohibitions, antitrust prohibitions, selling fee
prohibitions, kickback prohibitions, retaliation prohibitions, regulation of
how and if park rules are established, a right of first refusal when the
owner wants to sell the mobile home park, a peaceful enjoyment right,
and remedy provisions. The bill includes tiny homes under these
provisions.
Current law exempts manufactured homes from sales and use tax.
The bill adds tiny homes to this exemption.

House SponsorsT. Exum Sr. (D)
C. Kipp (D)
Senate SponsorsJ. Ginal (D)
D. Hisey (R)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeBusiness, Labor and Technology
StatusSenate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/09/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1282
Title: The Innovative Housing Incentive Program
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date03/07/2022
DescriptionConcerning the creation of the innovative housing incentive program.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
- State Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Bridges (D)
R. Woodward (R)
House:
K. Mullica (D)
M. Lynch (R)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/20/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill is a result of the Task Force established under HB21-1329 to address the issue of affordable housing.  Colorado is experiencing a lack of affordable housing at critical levels.

This bill creates the innovative housing incentive program within the office of economic development.  A business located in Colorado that manufactures certain types of housing may apply for funding through the program.  Funding may be awarded through grants for capital operating expenses and for incentives for unit manufactured based on criteria established b the office, such as affordability, location where the unit is installed in the state, or meeting energy efficiency standards.  Or, funding may be awarded through loans for the purpose of funding a manufacturing factory.  The bill creates the innovative housing incentive program fund, requires a $40 million transfer to the fund, and continuously appropriates all money in the fund to the office to fund the program.

Update: At a hearing on 3/24/22 in the Business Affairs & Labor was amended to Appropriation.  The Innovative Housing Incentive Program chase fund is continuously appropriated to CREDIT and thus, does not require an appropriation.  However, if the additional units generated by the bill exceed DOLA/s capacity, additional resources will be requested through the annual budget process.

 

Summary

The bill creates the innovative housing incentive program
(program) within the office of economic development (office). A business
located in Colorado that manufactures certain types of housing may apply
for funding through the program. Funding may be awarded through grants
for capital operating expenses and for incentives for units manufactured
based on criteria established by the office, such as affordability, location

where the unit is installed in the state, or meeting energy efficiency
standards. Or, funding may be awarded through loans for the purpose of
funding a manufacturing factory. The bill creates the innovative housing
incentive program fund, requires a $40 million transfer to the fund, and
continuously appropriates all money in the fund to the office to fund the
program.

House SponsorsK. Mullica (D)
M. Lynch (R)
Senate SponsorsJ. Bridges (D)
R. Woodward (R)
House CommitteeBusiness Affairs and Labor
Senate CommitteeBusiness, Labor and Technology
StatusSigned by the President of the Senate (05/09/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1287
Title: Protections For Mobile Home Park Residents
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date03/08/2022
DescriptionConcerning protections for mobile home park residents, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
House:
E. Hooton (D)
A. Boesenecker (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/03/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

In Colorado, approximately 100,000 people live in over 700 mobile home park communities throughout the state. Mobile homes make up the largest source of naturally occurring, unsubsidized affordable housing, with most residents being working-class families, seniors, people with disabilities, immigrant families, and veterans. Many of the residents are on fixed incomes. Most residents own their homes but lease the land (lot) on which their home sits. Most of the mobile homes are not movable so essentially the mobile home owners only have equity if they can stay in place. Previous laws, such as the “Mobile Home Park Act” and the “Mobile Home Park Dispute Resolution and Enforcement Program,” have been passed to provide some protections for residents in these unique landlord-tenant situations. This bill, the “Mobile Home Park Residents Protections Act” (HB22-1287), builds upon those protections based on needs raised by residents to protect affordability, increase stability, and ensure greater accountability. The League supports policies to provide a decent home and a suitable living environment for every American family, equal access to housing, and programs and policies to prevent or reduce poverty and to promote self-sufficiency for individuals and families. 

Mobile Home Park Residents Protections Act (HB22-1287): 

This long, complicated bill is designed to safeguard mobile home parks, which are Colorado’s largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing. These are the primary aspects of the bill.

Protecting Affordability and Stability of Housing—Limits lot rent increases to give residents predictability and minimize displacement. Most mobile home parks are made up of mobile home owners who own their homes and rent the land (lot) underneath, which leaves them vulnerable to unpredictable lot rent increases with little to no ability to move their home due to costly relocation fees and limited availability in other parks. Corporate interests and investment funds (often out-of-state) are purchasing mobile home parks in Colorado at an increasing rate, which has enhanced a trend of large lot rent increases and the conversion of mobile home parks to other uses. These trends are resulting in displacement of residents. HB22-1287 addresses these issues by: 

  • Establishing reasonable annual limits on lot rent increases as calculated by the Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) using a formula based on a percentage of annual inflation. This ensures mobile home park residents can continue to afford to live in their homes while also ensuring a fair return for park owners. 
  • Providing a 12-month time period in which a park owner must give residents notice if the owner decides to change the use of the park. It also requires the owner to either provide assistance with relocation costs or to furnish payment for the fair market value of the mobile home if it cannot be moved. 

Increasing Opportunities for Residents—Builds on the Opportunity to Purchase law to give residents better tools to manage their own communities. The Opportunity to Purchase Act passed in 2020 and sought to provide mobile home owners with opportunities to earn equity and with other opportunities for financial advancement that are afforded traditional homeowners. Since the passage of the law, over 43 mobile home parks have been sold yet only two of those have been purchased by residents. HB22-1287 updates Colorado’s Opportunity to Purchase law by: 

  • Extending time periods and clarifying the information and forms that residents receive related to an opportunity to purchase their park. 
  • Requiring that notices and information be in both Spanish and English. 
  • Allowing for a right of first refusal for public entities, wherein residents may assign their purchase right to a public entity who can then proceed on their behalf. 

Creating Greater Accountability—Improves the state's Mobile Home Park Oversight Program and the Mobile Home Park Act to keep park landlords accountable. Currently, laws related to the charging of fees, harassment of home owners, threats of eviction, and resident protections have little oversight and enforcement. For example, 20 mobile home parks have been sold by owners without following the resident opportunity to purchase law. HB22-1287 increases the enforcement authority of the Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) and the Attorney General’s Office by: 

  • Creating the authority for the Attorney General’s Office as part of the duty of consumer protection to enforce, investigate, and bring legal action for violations of the Mobile Home Park Act, the Mobile Home Park Dispute Resolution Program, and the Mobile Home Owner Opportunity to Purchase provisions. 
  • Giving the state Division of Housing the authority to expedite mobile home health and safety complaints, conduct investigations, issue cease and desist orders, and levy fines if appropriate. 
  • Ensuring that the majority of communications from landlords to residents is in both English and Spanish, including notices of water billing, educational materials on resident rights, and other such notices. 
  • Requiring that park owners maintain records related to rent increases, lease agreements, and park rules and regulations. 
Summary

The bill amends the Mobile Home Park Act and the Mobile
Home Park Act Dispute Resolution and Enforcement Program to:
  • Prohibit a landlord from increasing rent on a mobile home
lot by an amount that exceeds the greater of inflation or 3
percentage points in any 12-month period;
  • Require the landlord or the landlord's representative to
attend up to 2 public meetings for residents of the park
each year at the request of the residents;

  • Clarify that a landlord is responsible for the cost of
repairing any damage to a mobile home or lot that results
from the landlord's failure to maintain the premises of the
park;
  • Clarify the triggering events that demonstrate a park
owner's intent to sell a park for purposes of providing
notice to home owners and the method for giving notice;
  • Change the period in which a group or association of
mobile home owners may make an offer to purchase the
park from 90 to 180 days, and provide for tolling of that
time period in certain circumstances;
  • Provide a right of first refusal for a public entity that
accepts an assignment of a group or association of mobile
home owners' opportunity to purchase;
  • Clarify the obligations of a landlord to provide notice to
home owners concerning the terms and conditions of an
offer to purchase the park that the landlord would accept
and to negotiate in good faith with the home owners;
  • Require a landlord who changes the use of the land
comprising the park to compensate a mobile home owner
who has not given notice to terminate the lease or rental
agreement and who is displaced by the change in use for
the reasonable costs of relocating the mobile home to a
location within 100 miles of the park, the fair market value
of the mobile home before the change in use, or in the
amount of $7,500 for a single-section mobile home or
$10,000 for a multi-section mobile home;
  • Allow the department to enforce statutory provisions
concerning the required notice of intent to sell or change
the use of the land and the mobile home owners'
opportunity to purchase by imposing a fine for a violation
or filing for injunctive relief in district court;
  • Allow the attorney general to investigate and enforce
statutory provisions providing protections for mobile home
owners;
  • Allow a resident, local government, or a nonprofit to file a
complaint with the division under the dispute resolution
program;
  • Clarify the procedures and penalties that apply when a
party does not respond to a subpoena from the division;
  • Allow the division to take immediate action in response to
complaints or violations that will cause immediate harm to
mobile home owners;
  • Prohibit landlords from harassing or coercing mobile home
owners in an effort to require a mobile owner to sign an
agreement or to influence a decision by the home owner
about an opportunity to purchase;
  • Establish criteria for when a mobile home park rule or
regulation that limits a home owner's right to control the
use, appearance, and structure of a mobile home is
enforceable;
  • Prohibit a landlord from interfering with the mobile home
owner's right to sell a mobile home to the buyer of his or
her choice, except in limited circumstances;
  • Establish record retention requirements for landlords; and
  • Consolidate provisions concerning private rights of action
for landlords, home owners, and residents, and establish
penalties and remedies available in private actions.

House SponsorsE. Hooton (D)
A. Boesenecker (D)
Senate SponsorsF. Winter (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeFinance
StatusSigned by the Speaker of the House (05/14/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1304
Title: State Grants Investments Local Affordable Housing
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date03/16/2022
DescriptionConcerning state grants for investments in affordable housing at the local level, and, in connection therewith, creating the local investments in transformational affordable housing grant program and the infrastructure and strong communities grant program to invest in infill infrastructure projects that support affordable housing, and making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
- Local Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Coleman (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
House:
D. Roberts (D)
M. Bradfield (R)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/29/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bipartisan bill provides $178 million in grants for nonprofits and local governments to build and maintain affordable housing and to support infill infrastructure projects that support affordable housing in local communities across the state. This bill appropriates funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) based on recommendation of the state Affordable Housing Transformational Task Force.

The bill creates two grant programs in the Department of Local Affairs (DOLA):

  • Affordable Housing Grant Program administered by the Division of Housing (DOH; $150 million) 
    • Provides grants to certain governmental entities or nonprofit organizations for affordable housing initiatives, including developing housing infrastructure, providing gap financing, maintaining existing affordable housing stock, and land banking
    • DOLA must establish policies and procedures for the program by September 1, 2022.
    • Preference to projects or programs that increase the supply of housing needed for the local workforce or persons with disabilities, are transit oriented, leverage public and private capital, or involve land purchases for affordable housing 
  • Strong Communities Grant Program administered by the Division of Local Government (DLG; $28 million) 
    • Provides grants to local governments for investments in infill infrastructure projects that support affordable housing
    • Preference to projects in localities that employ best practices in their local policies 
Summary


The bill creates 2 state grant programs:
  • The local investments in transformational affordable
housing grant program (affordable housing grant program),
administered by the division of housing (DOH) in the
department of local affairs (department); and
  • The infrastructure and strong communities grant program
(strong communities grant program), administered by the
division of local government (DLG) in the department.
The affordable housing grant program provides grants to local
governments and nonprofit organizations to enable such entities to make
investments in their communities or regions of the state in
transformational affordable housing and housing related matters. The
strong communities grant program provides grants to eligible local
governments to enable local governments to invest in infill infrastructure
projects that support affordable housing.
The strong communities grant program portion of the bill requires
a multi-agency group, comprised of DLG, the state energy office, and the
department of transportation, with the assistance of stakeholders, to
develop a list of sustainable land use best practices that will accomplish
the goals of the grant program and improve a local government's viability
in being considered for a grant award.
The bill requires both DOH and DLG to develop policies,
procedures, and guidelines governing the administration of the respective
grant programs. The bill specifies how grant funding is to be prioritized
and eligible uses of grant money awarded under the grant programs.
The bill creates 2 funds in the state treasury: The local investments
in transformational affordable housing fund and the infrastructure and
strong communities grant program fund. The bill specifies requirements
pertaining to the administration of these funds.
Both funds are initially supported with a transfer of a specified
amount of money from different funds.
Both grant programs are subject to reporting requirements
specified in the bill, and both grant programs are repealed by a date
specified in the bill.

House SponsorsD. Roberts (D)
M. Bradfield (R)
Senate SponsorsJ. Coleman (D)
J. Gonzales (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeLocal Government
StatusHouse Considered Senate Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1377
Title: Grant Program Providing Responses To Homelessness
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date04/18/2022
DescriptionConcerning the creation of the connecting Coloradans experiencing homelessness with services, recovery care, and housing supports grant program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Human Services
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Gonzales (D)
C. Kolker (D)
House:
T. Exum Sr. (D)
S. Woodrow (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/03/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill creates grant program for local governments/non-profits to reduce rate of homelessness with award made by DOLA.  It will connect Coloradoans experiencing homelessness with services, treatment and housing supports.  The goal is to reduce rate of homelessness thru community-based support systems.  The bill has an estimated cost of $105 (derived through ARPA funds), according to the fiscal note.

The League supports policies to provide a decent home and suitable living environment for every American and we support measures that strengthen equal access to housing.

 

 

Summary

The bill creates the connecting Coloradans experiencing
homelessness with services, treatment, and housing supports grant
program (grant program), administered by the division of housing
(division) in the department of local affairs (department).

The grant program provides grants to local governments and
nonprofit organizations to enable those entities to make investments and
improvements in their communities or regions of the state to address and
respond to the needs of people experiencing homelessness.
The bill requires the division to develop policies, procedures, and
guidelines governing the administration of the grant program. The bill
specifies how grant funding is to be awarded and the eligible uses of grant
money awarded under the grant program. The bill specifies requirements
for grant recipients.
The bill creates the connecting Coloradans experiencing
homelessness with services, treatment, and housing supports fund (fund)
in the department. The bill specifies requirements pertaining to the
administration of the fund. The bill requires a transfer of $105 million
from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the fund to administer
the grant program.
The bill sets forth specified reporting requirements pertaining to
the grant program.
The bill requires the department, in conjunction with the
department of health care policy and financing, to report to the house of
representatives public and behavioral health and human services
committee and the senate health and human services committee, and to
its committee of reference during its State Measurement for
Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act
hearing, any results, recommendations, and federal implications
concerning any supportive housing pilot program currently being
administered by the department in conjunction with the department of
health care policy and financing.
The bill requires the division to report on the activities of the grant
program as part of the regular annual public report prepared by the
division on affordable and emergency housing spending.

House SponsorsT. Exum Sr. (D)
S. Woodrow (D)
Senate SponsorsJ. Gonzales (D)
C. Kolker (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeFinance
StatusSenate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/09/2022)
Amendments

Bill: HB22-1378
Title: Denver-metro Regional Navigation Campus Grant
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date04/18/2022
DescriptionConcerning the Denver-metropolitan regional navigation campus grant to address homelessness, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
C. Hansen (D)
J. Coleman (D)
House:
T. Sullivan (D)
I. Jodeh (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/02/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill directs the Division of Housing in the Department of Local Affairs (division) to award a grant to a local government in the Denver metropolitan area or a community partner in conjunction with a local government in order to build or acquire, and then facilitate, a regional navigation campus to respond to and prevent homelessness,

This bill requires the division, in collaboration with the Department of Human Services and the Behavioral Health Administration in the Department of Human Services, to establish the application requirements, review applications, select grant recipient, and ensure the grant is only awarded after a fair and rigorous open competition among eligible applicants.

The bill creates the regional navigation campus cash fund and requires the state treasurer to transfer $50 million from the economic recovery and relief cash fund to the regional navigation campus cash fund on July 1.

Update on bill HB22-1083.  It has been assigned to the Senate Appropriation Committee on 4/28 at 8:30 am in the Leg. Services Bldg., Hearing Room B

Update on Bill HB22-1056.  It will be heard in the Senate Health & Human Services Committee, on 4/28 1:30 pm, Old Supreme Court Chambers.

Summary

The bill directs the division of housing in the department of local
affairs (division) to award a grant to a local government in the Denver
metropolitan area or a community partner in conjunction with a local
government in order to build or acquire, and then facilitate, a regional
navigation campus to respond to and prevent homelessness.
The bill requires the division, in collaboration with the department

of human services and the behavioral health administration in the
department of human services, to establish the application requirements,
review applications, select a grant recipient, and ensure the grant is only
awarded after a fair and rigorous open competition among eligible
applicants.
The bill creates the regional navigation campus cash fund and
requires the state treasurer to transfer $50 million from the economic
recovery and relief cash fund to the regional navigation campus cash fund
on July 1, 2022.

House SponsorsT. Sullivan (D)
I. Jodeh (D)
Senate SponsorsC. Hansen (D)
J. Coleman (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeTransportation and Energy
StatusSenate Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/06/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-019
Title: Access To Suppressed Court Eviction Records
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/12/2022
DescriptionConcerning access to automatically suppressed court records of eviction proceedings.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Courts & Judicial
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
F. Winter (D)
House:
S. Woodrow (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/07/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

Under existing law, a court record in an eviction proceeding is automatically suppressed and only available to judges, court staff, a party to the case, the party's attorneys, authorized judicial department staff, and a person with a valid court order authorizing access to the court record. SB22-019 also permits an attorney, with the permission of a party included in a suppressed court record, to access the record for the purpose of providing legal advice to the party or evaluating whether to enter an appearance on behalf of the party. 

The League supports measures that strengthen procedures so that equality of opportunity for access to housing can be accomplished. The League supported HB20-1009 (Suppressing Court Records of Eviction Proceedings), which is now current law. SB22-019 remedies an unintended consequence of HB20-1009 that prevents access to eviction records for the purpose of providing legal advice. SB22-019 does not change the suppression of eviction records from public access to allow people to defend their rights without fear of creating a court record. An eviction filing is not the same as an eviction, may not accurately reflect a tenant’s history, and should not be used to deny someone housing. 

Summary

Under existing law, a court record in an eviction proceeding is
automatically suppressed and only available to judges; court staff; a party
to the case and, if represented, the party's attorneys; authorized judicial
department staff; and a person with a valid court order authorizing access
to the court record. The bill permits an attorney, with permission of a
party included in a suppressed court record, to access the record for the

purpose of providing legal advice to, or evaluating whether to enter an
appearance on behalf of, the party included in the record.

House SponsorsS. Woodrow (D)
Senate SponsorsF. Winter (D)
House CommitteeJudiciary
Senate CommitteeJudiciary
StatusGovernor Signed (03/15/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-063
Title: Property Ownership Fairness Act
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/18/2022
DescriptionConcerning the "property ownership fairness act".
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Local Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
L. Liston (R)
House:
A. Pico (R)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (01/27/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

UPDATE: This bill was laid over for action during the February 8 Senate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs hearing. During the hearing, an amendment (L.002) was introduced that strikes all of the bill except the language that prohibits a governmental entity from enacting a land use law that caps residential building permits issued in a single or multi-year period with the intent of limiting growth or development. 

As stated in the legislative declaration of this bill:

THE LACK OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN COLORADO IS DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE SCARCITY OF HOUSING UNITS; 

THE ENACTMENT OF "ANTI-GROWTH" LAND USE LAWS BY LOCAL GOVERNMENTS SEVERELY UNDERMINES THE ABILITY TO CONSTRUCT THE ADDITIONAL HOUSING UNITS COLORADANS NEED; and 

"ANTI-GROWTH" LAND USE LAWS DO IRREPARABLE ECONOMIC HARM TO WORKING CLASS COLORADANS BY LIMITING THE HOUSING SUPPLY AND DRIVING UP HOUSING PRICES AND RENTS. 

The League supports policies to provide a decent home and a suitable living environment for every American family. Across Colorado, there is a severe shortage of affordable housing. Local anti-growth ordinances have been identified as barriers to the creation of housing and can be an infringement on the rights of property owners. 

As a result of the amendment, LWVCO has changed our position from OPPOSE to AMEND.

Bill Summary: This bill would allow property owner to demand compensation for fair market value loss if government entity enacts a land use law that negatively impacts owners right to use, divide, sell or possess property.

LWVCO identifies the following potential areas for negative impact:

-creates burden for city/county

-interferes with government ability to regulate land use for public good

-tips balance between public good versus private property in favor of private property

-prohibit anti-growth land use laws

-puts restraints on local government to provide needed housing opportunities for individuals/families

LWVCO opposes this bill.

Summary

The bill enacts the Property Ownership Fairness Act (act). The
bill entitles a property owner to seek just compensation from a
governmental entity that enacts a land use law reducing the right of a
property owner to use, divide, sell, or possess their property and reducing
the fair market value of the property. The bill sets forth the procedure by
which a property owner can demand just compensation and sets forth
exceptions where a property owner is not entitled to seek just
compensation for a land use law. Additionally, the bill prohibits a

governmental entity from enacting a land use law that caps residential
building permits issued in a single or multi-year period with the intent of
limiting growth or development.

House SponsorsA. Pico (R)
Senate SponsorsL. Liston (R)
House Committee
Senate CommitteeState, Veterans and Military Affairs
StatusSenate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely (03/01/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-072
Title: Grants To Incentivize Home Use For Renters
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date01/19/2022
DescriptionConcerning the creation of a grant program to make grant awards to home owners who make residential space in their homes available for individuals seeking housing on a long-term rental basis.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- State Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
P. Lundeen (R)
House:
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (02/10/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Summary

The bill creates the grants to homeowners to make residential
space available to renters grant program (grant program) as a 3-year pilot
program in the division of housing (division) within the department of

local affairs (DOLA). The grant program is established to provide state
assistance in the form of a one-time grant award of $500 to eligible
recipients who make residential space available within their homes for the
use of individuals seeking long-term rental housing. The grant program
must operate for 3 consecutive state fiscal years, commencing with the
2023-24 state fiscal year through the 2025-26 state fiscal year.
The division administers the grant program. The division is
required to create a process by which grant awards are made.
In order to be eligible to receive a grant award under the bill, an
individual must:
  • Be the owner of record of residential real property that the
individual occupies as the individual's primary residence
(owner-occupier);
  • Be at least 55 years of age as of the date of an application
submitted by the individual for a grant award;
  • Make residential space available within the
owner-occupier's home for use by an individual seeking
housing on a rental basis for a period of not less than 180
consecutive days.
The bill creates the grants to homeowners to make residential
space available to renters grant program fund (fund) in the state treasury.
The fund funds grant awards under the grant program and the
administrative costs of the division in administering the grant program.
The division is required to publish on an annual basis a report
summarizing the use of the money that was awarded under the grant
program in the preceding fiscal year. The bill specifies minimum contents
of the report, and the report must be posted on DOLA's and the division's
websites. The division is also required to prepare educational materials
concerning the grant program and to display such materials on its page on
DOLA's website.
Each county treasurer is required to include general information
about the grant program in the notice the assessor sends concerning the
property tax exemption for qualifying seniors. The division is required to
provide information to the county treasurers about the grant program for
inclusion in the notice.

House Sponsors
Senate SponsorsP. Lundeen (R)
House Committee
Senate CommitteeLocal Government
StatusSenate Committee on Local Government Postpone Indefinitely (03/08/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-146
Title: Middle Income Access Program Expansion
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date03/07/2022
DescriptionConcerning the expansion of the Colorado housing and finance authority's middle income access program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
D. Hisey (R)
House:
M. Catlin (R)
M. Snyder (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/18/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

Funding recommended by Housing Task Force report (January, 2022) to address affordable housing.  American Rescue Plan monies in amount of $25 million designed to provide financing to developers to build affordable rental housing to Coloradoans with an 80% area median income and above.  Will fill a gap as existing resources support housing development for those with 60% median income and below.  Addresses “missing middle” workforce – incomes too high for credits under current structure but overburdened by market rents.  Support comes from all regions of the state.

Summary

The bill transfers $25 million to the department of local affairs
(DOLA) for expansion of the middle income access program created and
administered by the Colorado housing and finance authority (CHFA). The
bill requires the division of housing within DOLA to contract with CHFA
for administration of the money transferred.

House SponsorsM. Catlin (R)
M. Snyder (D)
Senate SponsorsR. Zenzinger (D)
D. Hisey (R)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeLocal Government
StatusSigned by the Speaker of the House (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-159
Title: Revolving Loan Fund Invest Affordable Housing
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date03/17/2022
DescriptionConcerning the creation of a revolving loan fund within the division of housing in the department of local affairs to make investments in transformational affordable housing, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Zenzinger (D)
J. Bridges (D)
House:
P. Will (R)
D. Ortiz (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/27/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill creates the transformational affordable housing revolving loan fund program in the division of housing in the department of local affairs as a revolving loan program in accordance with the requirements of the bill and the policies established by the division.  The loan program provides flexible, low-interest, and below-market rate loan funding to assist eligible recipients in completing the eligible loan projects identified in the bill.  The division may administer the loan program or, if it determines that it would be more efficient and effective to contract out full or partial administration of the program, the division may enter into a contract with a third-party entity to administer the loan program.

The division is required to establish and publicize policies for the loan program.  The bill specifies factors the division is encouraged to consider in evaluating loan applications. 

The transformational affordable housing revolving loan fund is created in the state treasury and the bill specifies requirements pertaining to the administration of the fund.

The bill requires a transfer of a specified sum of money to the fund.

The division is required to report on the activities of the loan program as part of the regular annual public report prepared by the division on affordable housing spending undertaken by the state.

The fiscal note is $150 million.  

 

Summary

The bill creates the transformational affordable housing revolving
loan fund program (loan program) in the division of housing (division) in
the department of local affairs (department) as a revolving loan program

in accordance with the requirements of the bill and the policies
established by the division. The loan program provides flexible,
low-interest, and below-market rate loan funding to assist eligible
recipients in completing the eligible loan projects identified in the bill.
The division may administer the loan program or, if it determines
that it would be more efficient and effective to contract out full or partial
administration of the program, the division may enter into a contract with
a third-party entity to administer the loan program.
The division is required to establish and publicize policies for the
loan program. The bill specifies factors the division is encouraged to
consider in evaluating loan applications.
The transformational affordable housing revolving loan fund
(fund) is created in the state treasury and the bill specifies requirements
pertaining to the administration of the fund.
The bill requires a transfer of a specified sum of money to the
fund.
The division is required to report on the activities of the loan
program as part of the regular annual public report prepared by the
division on affordable housing spending undertaken by the state.

House SponsorsP. Will (R)
D. Ortiz (D)
Senate SponsorsR. Zenzinger (D)
J. Bridges (D)
House CommitteeFinance
Senate CommitteeLocal Government
StatusSenate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-160
Title: Loan Program Resident-owned Communities
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date03/17/2022
DescriptionConcerning programs to preserve mobile home communities, and, in connection therewith, establishing a revolving loan and grant program to assist mobile home owners seeking to purchase their communities, and making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
J. Gonzales (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House:
A. Boesenecker (D)
M. Lindsay (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (04/22/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill creates the Mobile Home Park Resident Empowerment Loan and Grant Program, a dedicated $35 million revolving loan and grant program to assist mobile home owners or their assignees seeking to purchase their communities. The bill also provides funding for technical assistance to support residents in this process. Currently, existing organizations dedicated to financing mobile home parks with the goal of providing affordable, cooperative housing do not have the capacity to finance every park that goes up for sale, especially with rising property values in Colorado. Historically, banks and other lending institutions have not provided low-interest loans to mobile home owners to purchase their parks. The Mobile Home Park Resident Empowerment Loan and Grant Program created by this bill supports funding for mobile home park resident owned communities, which was one of the priority funding recommendations of the state’s Affordable Housing Transformational Task Force. 

Summary

The bill establishes a revolving loan and grant program to provide
assistance and financing to mobile home owners seeking to organize and
purchase their mobile home parks. The division of housing (division) in

the department of local affairs (department) is required to contract with
at least 2, and not more than 3, loan program administrators, unless the
division determines that there is only one qualified applicant during an
open and competitive selection process, in which case the division may
contract with a single administrator.
The administrators are required to use money provided by the loan
program to make loans to mobile home owners seeking to purchase their
mobile home parks. The division is required to establish a grant program
to provide grants to nonprofit organizations that provide technical and
other assistance to eligible home owners seeking to organize to purchase
their mobile home parks. The division is also required to establish a grant
program to provide grants to eligible home owners to support programs
to ensure the long term affordability of a resident-owned park, including
by stabilizing lot rents and limiting rent increases.

House SponsorsA. Boesenecker (D)
M. Lindsay (D)
Senate SponsorsJ. Gonzales (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House CommitteeTransportation and Local Government
Senate CommitteeLocal Government
StatusSigned by the Speaker of the House (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-211
Title: Repurpose The Ridge View Campus
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date04/18/2022
DescriptionConcerning the repurposing of the Ridge View campus into a supportive residential community for people experiencing homelessness, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Human Services
- State Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
R. Fields (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House:
A. Valdez (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/03/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary

This bill requires that the Ridge View Campus in Watkins be repurposed and converted into the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community, which would provide transitional housing, a continuum of behavioral health services and treatment, medical care, vocational training, and skill development for residents. To be eligible for the community, an individual must be experiencing homelessness or at risk of experiencing it, voluntarily choose to focus on recovery, and be in a position where it is medically safe to be in transitional housing. The administrator of the community must work with local providers across the state to set up a referral system for clients to live at the community. The Division of Housing must comply with specified reporting requirements.

The League supports programs and policies to prevent or reduce poverty and to promote self-sufficiency for individuals and families, and access to safe and stable housing for people with behavioral health challenges including those who are chronically homeless. Colorado's chronically sheltered homeless population grew by 266% between 2007 and 2021, which is more than any other state, according to a report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Colorado’s homelessness crisis has worsened during the pandemic. First-time homelessness in metro Denver doubled in 2021 over 2020 according to the State of Homelessness report by Metro Denver Homeless Initiative (MDHI). Black, indigenous, and people of color were overrepresented in the numbers compared to white people. For example, of the 10,870 unsheltered adults, nearly 23% were Black, which is 4.5 times the percentage in the metro population.

Funding of $45 million for this project will be through the Economic Recovery and Relief Cash Fund, which contains American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds. Any money not spent in FY 2022-23 remains available in subsequent state fiscal years without further appropriations, subject to the requirements of federal law. The Ridge View Supportive Residential Community is modeled after the Fort Lyon Supportive Residential Community in Las Animas that opened in 2013. Individuals who are chronically homeless often are the highest users of community services (e.g., emergency, in-patient and out-patient physical and behavioral health care, and social services). The Fort Lyon 2018 Evaluation report states that “The average total costs per Fort Lyon Program participant decreased by 33 percent from pre-enrollment in the Fort Lyon Program to post-enrollment for participants who had 1-year of post-enrollment data and who received Medicaid both pre- and post-enrollment. Results show decreases of 9 percent for physical health care, 34 percent for behavioral health care, 80 percent for the judicial system (i.e., incarceration, probation, and jail), and 65 percent for shelters and vouchers.” In considering the ongoing operational costs of the proposed Ridge View Supportive Residential Community, it is important to consider the broad potential cost savings and the societal benefits.

 

Summary

In 2001, the state began operating an academic model juvenile
facility on the parcel of real property formerly known as the Lowry
bombing range and currently referred to as the Ridge View campus. The
juvenile facility, known as the Ridge View Youth Services Center,
operated for 20 years at the Ridge View campus until the state closed the

facility in 2021. The bill requires that the Ridge View campus be
repurposed and converted into the Ridge View Supportive Residential
Community to provide transitional housing, a continuum of behavioral
health service treatment, medical care, vocational training, and skill
development for its residents and the general public.
The department of human services (department) is required to
transfer ownership of all or part of the Ridge View campus to the
department of personnel for use by the division of housing (division) for
the purposes of repurposing the Ridge View campus. The division, in
collaboration with the behavioral health administration and the
department of human services, is required to develop a feasible master
plan for the redevelopment and operations of the Ridge View campus and
is required to enter into one or more contracts with private contractors to
establish the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community at the Ridge
View campus.
The Ridge View Supportive Residential Community is required to
provide the following services and programs:
  • A transitional housing program for individual adults with
case management, care coordination, and vocational and
housing placement assistance;
  • A continuum of behavioral health services and treatment,
informed by American Society of Addiction Medicine
standards, available to people coming from the transitional
housing program and to the general public; and
  • A federally qualified health clinic at which people have
access to medical treatments that help facilitate recovery,
including medical and dental care and a continuum of
behavioral health services. The health clinic and all
behavioral health services and treatment are required to be
accessible to people receiving other treatment at the Ridge
View Supportive Residential Community, people residing
in the transitional housing, and the general public.
The bill specifies eligibility criteria for the programs and services
that will be offered at the Ridge View Supportive Residential Community
and specifies how individuals may be referred to the community.
For the 2022-23 state fiscal year, the bill requires the general
assembly to appropriate money from the economic recovery and relief
cash fund to the division for the repurposing of the Ridge View campus
and authorizes the division to use up to 10% of the amount appropriated
for its administrative costs in connection with the repurposing of the
Ridge View campus. The bill requires the division to comply with
specified reporting requirements.

House SponsorsA. Valdez (D)
Senate SponsorsR. Fields (D)
N. Hinrichsen (D)
House CommitteePublic and Behavioral Health & Human Services
Senate CommitteeHealth and Human Services
StatusHouse Third Reading Passed - No Amendments (05/10/2022)
Amendments

Bill: SB22-232
Title: Creation Of Colorado Workforce Housing Trust Authority
VotesVotes all Legislators
Hearing Date
Hearing Time
Hearing Room
Intro Date04/26/2022
DescriptionConcerning the provision of workforce housing through the creation of the middle-income housing authority, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
HistoryBill History
Save to Calendar
Bill Subject- Housing
- State Government
Bill DocsBill Documents
Sponsors (House and Senate)Senate:
D. Moreno (D)
J. Bridges (D)
House:
L. Herod (D)
T. Bernett (D)
Fiscal NotesFiscal Notes (05/10/2022)
Full TextFull Text of Bill
LobbyistsLobbyists
Position
Category
Comment
Custom Summary
Summary

The bill creates the Colorado workforce housing trust authority
(authority) for the purpose of acquiring, constructing, rehabilitating,
owning, operating, and financing affordable rental housing projects for
middle-income workforce housing. The authority is governed by a board
of directors composed of appointees by the governor with the consent of

the senate. The bill specifies requirements governing the appointment of
board members and other administrative details. The board must solicit
project proposals by October 1, 2022. Rental units in affordable rental
housing projects must provide middle-income workforce housing with
stable rents.
The authority is a public entity and is a special purpose
authority for the purpose of TABOR.
The authority is authorized to exercise the powers necessary to
acquire, construct, rehabilitate, own, operate, and finance affordable
rental housing projects, including but not limited to:
  • The power to issue bonds payable solely from revenues
from affordable rental housing projects and with no
recourse to the state;
  • The power to enter into public-private partnerships and to
contract with experienced real estate professionals to
develop and operate affordable rental housing projects;
  • The power to employ its own personnel or contract with
public or private entities, or both, for services necessary or
convenient to the conduct of all of the authority's activities;
  • To provide assistance to tenants in its rental housing to
enable a transition to home ownership; and
  • To establish one or more controlled entities to carry out its
activities.

House SponsorsL. Herod (D)
T. Bernett (D)
Senate SponsorsD. Moreno (D)
J. Bridges (D)
House CommitteeAppropriations
Senate CommitteeState, Veterans and Military Affairs
StatusSenate Considered House Amendments - Result was to Concur - Repass (05/11/2022)
Amendments
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