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Bill No. Title Bill DocsStatusSenate CommitteeHouse CommitteeSenate SponsorsHouse SponsorsOfficial SummaryCustom SummaryCommentLobbyistsFull TextFiscal NotesBill SubjectSave to
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HistoryCCW SummaryIntro DateHearing RoomHearing TimeHearing DateCategoryPositionFull TextFiscal NotesHearing DateSenate SponsorsHouse CommitteeCommentCategoryPositionLobbyistsStatusSenate CommitteeVotesHearing TimeHearing RoomIntro DateCCW SummaryCustom SummaryOfficial SummaryHouse SponsorsVotes
HB17-1045 Extend Home Care Allowance Grant Program Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 06/05/2017Health and Human ServicesPublic Health Care and Human ServicesK. Lambert (R)D. Young (D)

The bill modifies the repeal date of the home care allowance grant
program (program). The program will repeal when the revisor of statutes
receives notice that there is a consumer-directed service delivery option
available for homemaker, personal care, and medical support services for
individuals who are receiving home-based and community-based services
pursuant to the supported living services waiver.
The bill requires the executive director of the department of human
services and the executive director of the department of health care policy
and financing to notify the revisor of statutes when the triggering event
occurs.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/15/2017- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Health Care & Health Insurance
- Human Services
- State Government
Bill History

Concerning the home care allowance grant program.

01/11/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/15/2017K. Lambert (R)Public Health Care and Human ServicescLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 06/05/2017Health and Human ServicesVotes all Legislators01/11/2017

Concerning the home care allowance grant program.

The bill modifies the repeal date of the home care allowance grant
program (program). The program will repeal when the revisor of statutes
receives notice that there is a consumer-directed service delivery option
available for homemaker, personal care, and medical support services for
individuals who are receiving home-based and community-based services
pursuant to the supported living services waiver.
The bill requires the executive director of the department of human
services and the executive director of the department of health care policy
and financing to notify the revisor of statutes when the triggering event
occurs.

D. Young (D)Votes all Legislators
HB17-1106 Extend Early Childhood Leadership Commission Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 06/05/2017Health and Human ServicesEducationN. Todd (D)
B. Martinez Humenik (R)
B. Pettersen (D)
J. Wilson (R)

The bill amends the statutes relating to the early childhood
leadership commission (commission) in the department of human services
(department) as follows:
  • Makes changes to the legislative declaration, mission, and
duties of the commission to include consideration of
families of pregnant women and children;
  • Increases membership from 20 members to 25 members.
Among other members described in the bill, the new
members may include representatives of programs
providing early childhood services and supports for
military families.
  • Changes the title of the person appointed to assist the
department in fulfilling the duties of the commission from
executive director to director;
  • Removes the requirement that the director be compensated
from money credited to the early childhood leadership
commission fund;
  • Permits the commission to seek, accept, and expend gifts,
grants, and donations for the expenses of the commission;
  • Allows general fund appropriations for the commission;
and
  • Extends the repeal date and sunset review of the
commission prior to its repeal from 2018 to 2023.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/14/2017- Children & Domestic Matters
- Education & School Finance (Pre & K-12)
- Human Services
Bill History

Concerning the early childhood leadership commission.

01/19/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/14/2017N. Todd (D)
B. Martinez Humenik (R)
EducationcLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 06/05/2017Health and Human ServicesVotes all Legislators01/19/2017

Concerning the early childhood leadership commission.

The bill amends the statutes relating to the early childhood
leadership commission (commission) in the department of human services
(department) as follows:
  • Makes changes to the legislative declaration, mission, and
duties of the commission to include consideration of
families of pregnant women and children;
  • Increases membership from 20 members to 25 members.
Among other members described in the bill, the new
members may include representatives of programs
providing early childhood services and supports for
military families.
  • Changes the title of the person appointed to assist the
department in fulfilling the duties of the commission from
executive director to director;
  • Removes the requirement that the director be compensated
from money credited to the early childhood leadership
commission fund;
  • Permits the commission to seek, accept, and expend gifts,
grants, and donations for the expenses of the commission;
  • Allows general fund appropriations for the commission;
and
  • Extends the repeal date and sunset review of the
commission prior to its repeal from 2018 to 2023.

B. Pettersen (D)
J. Wilson (R)
Votes all Legislators
HB17-1116 Continue Low-income Household Energy Assistance Bill DocumentsSenate Committee on Agriculture, Natural Resources, & Energy Refer Unamended to Appropriations: 01/20/2017Agriculture, Natural Resources, and EnergyTransportation & EnergyB. Martinez Humenik (R)M. Hamner (D)
T. Exum Sr. (D)

Current law provides that the department of human services
low-income energy assistance fund, the energy outreach Colorado
low-income energy assistance fund, and the Colorado energy office
low-income energy assistance fund receive conditional funding from the
severance tax operational fund through the state fiscal year commencing
July 1, 2018. The bill removes the automatic repeal which means that
these funds will be eligible for this conditional funding indefinitely.

LobbyistsFull Text of Bill - State Revenue & Budget
Bill History

Concerning the continuation of energy-related assistance to low-income households.

01/20/2017cFull Text of Bill B. Martinez Humenik (R)Transportation & EnergycLobbyistsSenate Committee on Agriculture, Natural Resources, & Energy Refer Unamended to Appropriations: 01/20/2017Agriculture, Natural Resources, and EnergyVotes all Legislators01/20/2017

Concerning the continuation of energy-related assistance to low-income households.

Current law provides that the department of human services
low-income energy assistance fund, the energy outreach Colorado
low-income energy assistance fund, and the Colorado energy office
low-income energy assistance fund receive conditional funding from the
severance tax operational fund through the state fiscal year commencing
July 1, 2018. The bill removes the automatic repeal which means that
these funds will be eligible for this conditional funding indefinitely.

M. Hamner (D)
T. Exum Sr. (D)
Votes all Legislators
HB17-1171 Authorize New Transportation Revenue Anticipation Notes Bill DocumentsHouse Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 03/29/2017State, Veterans, & Military AffairsT. Carver (R)
P. Buck (R)

In 1999, the voters of the state authorized the executive director of
the department of transportation (executive director) to issue
transportation revenue anticipation notes (TRANs) in a maximum
principal amount of $1.7 billion and with a maximum repayment cost of
$2.3 billion in order to provide financing to accelerate the construction of
qualified federal aid transportation projects. The executive director issued
the TRANs as authorized. The final payments of principal and interest on
the TRANs will be made during fiscal year 2016-17, which will make
available for expenditure for transportation-related purposes only
revenues dedicated for transportation by federal law, the state
constitution, and state law that the state has been using to make principal
and interest payments on the TRANs.
Section 3 of the bill repeals a requirement that the state treasurer
make conditional transfers, which are reduced or eliminated if the state
is required to refund excess state revenues in accordance with the
taxpayer's bill of rights, of a specified percentage of total general fund
revenues from the general fund to the capital construction fund and the
highway users tax fund for state fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, and
2019-20.
Section 4 of the bill requires the state transportation commission
to submit a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017
statewide election, which, if approved, would authorize the executive
director to issue additional TRANs in a maximum principal amount of
$3.5 billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $5 billion once the
TRANs already issued are repaid in full. The additional TRANs must
have a maximum repayment term of 20 years, and the certificate, trust
indenture, or other instrument authorizing their issuance must provide that
the state may pay them in full before the end of the specified payment
term without penalty. Additional TRANs must otherwise generally be
issued subject to the same requirements and for the same purposes as the
original TRANs; except that the transportation commission must pledge
to annually allocate from legally available money under its control any
money needed for payment of the notes in excess of amounts appropriated
by the general assembly from the state highway fund for payment of the
notes as authorized by section 6 of the bill until the notes are fully repaid.
Section 5 of the bill requires proceeds from the sale of any
additional TRANs that are not otherwise pledged for the payment of the
TRANs to be used only for specified projects until all of the projects have
been funded in whole or in part with such proceeds and have been fully
funded and specifies additional transportation project contract award
process requirements and limitations for a project to be funded in whole
or in part with proceeds of additional TRANs.
Sections 6 and 7 of the bill require 10% of state sales and use tax
net revenue collected on or after July 1, 2017, to be credited to the
highway users tax fund (HUTF), paid from the HUTF to the state
highway fund for use, subject to annual appropriation by the general
assembly, for payment of TRANs and, to the extent not used for that
purpose, state transportation projects. Section 6 also requires 1% of state
sales and use tax net revenue collected on or after July 1, 2017, less ten
million dollars to be credited to the capital construction fund.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 07/10/2017- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Transportation & Motor Vehicles
Bill History

Concerning infrastructure funding, and, in connection therewith, requiring the transportation commission to submit a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017 statewide election which, if approved, would authorize the state, with no increase in any taxes, to issue additional transportation revenue anticipation notes for the purpose of addressing critical priority transportation needs in the state by financing transportation projects and would exclude note proceeds and investment earnings on note proceeds from state fiscal year spending limits; and dedicating ten percent of state sales and use tax net revenue for state transportation purposes and one percent of such revenue less ten million dollars for other capital construction purposes.

02/06/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 07/10/2017State, Veterans, & Military AffairscLobbyistsHouse Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 03/29/2017Votes all Legislators02/06/2017

Concerning infrastructure funding, and, in connection therewith, requiring the transportation commission to submit a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017 statewide election which, if approved, would authorize the state, with no increase in any taxes, to issue additional transportation revenue anticipation notes for the purpose of addressing critical priority transportation needs in the state by financing transportation projects and would exclude note proceeds and investment earnings on note proceeds from state fiscal year spending limits; and dedicating ten percent of state sales and use tax net revenue for state transportation purposes and one percent of such revenue less ten million dollars for other capital construction purposes.

In 1999, the voters of the state authorized the executive director of
the department of transportation (executive director) to issue
transportation revenue anticipation notes (TRANs) in a maximum
principal amount of $1.7 billion and with a maximum repayment cost of
$2.3 billion in order to provide financing to accelerate the construction of
qualified federal aid transportation projects. The executive director issued
the TRANs as authorized. The final payments of principal and interest on
the TRANs will be made during fiscal year 2016-17, which will make
available for expenditure for transportation-related purposes only
revenues dedicated for transportation by federal law, the state
constitution, and state law that the state has been using to make principal
and interest payments on the TRANs.
Section 3 of the bill repeals a requirement that the state treasurer
make conditional transfers, which are reduced or eliminated if the state
is required to refund excess state revenues in accordance with the
taxpayer's bill of rights, of a specified percentage of total general fund
revenues from the general fund to the capital construction fund and the
highway users tax fund for state fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, and
2019-20.
Section 4 of the bill requires the state transportation commission
to submit a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017
statewide election, which, if approved, would authorize the executive
director to issue additional TRANs in a maximum principal amount of
$3.5 billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $5 billion once the
TRANs already issued are repaid in full. The additional TRANs must
have a maximum repayment term of 20 years, and the certificate, trust
indenture, or other instrument authorizing their issuance must provide that
the state may pay them in full before the end of the specified payment
term without penalty. Additional TRANs must otherwise generally be
issued subject to the same requirements and for the same purposes as the
original TRANs; except that the transportation commission must pledge
to annually allocate from legally available money under its control any
money needed for payment of the notes in excess of amounts appropriated
by the general assembly from the state highway fund for payment of the
notes as authorized by section 6 of the bill until the notes are fully repaid.
Section 5 of the bill requires proceeds from the sale of any
additional TRANs that are not otherwise pledged for the payment of the
TRANs to be used only for specified projects until all of the projects have
been funded in whole or in part with such proceeds and have been fully
funded and specifies additional transportation project contract award
process requirements and limitations for a project to be funded in whole
or in part with proceeds of additional TRANs.
Sections 6 and 7 of the bill require 10% of state sales and use tax
net revenue collected on or after July 1, 2017, to be credited to the
highway users tax fund (HUTF), paid from the HUTF to the state
highway fund for use, subject to annual appropriation by the general
assembly, for payment of TRANs and, to the extent not used for that
purpose, state transportation projects. Section 6 also requires 1% of state
sales and use tax net revenue collected on or after July 1, 2017, less ten
million dollars to be credited to the capital construction fund.

T. Carver (R)
P. Buck (R)
Votes all Legislators
HB17-1192 Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council Bill DocumentsSenate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 05/04/2017State, Veterans, and Military AffairsAgriculture, Livestock and Natural ResourcesD. Coram (R)
R. Fields (D)
C. Duran (D)
B. McLachlan (D)

The bill repeals the interagency farm-to-school coordination task
force (task force) and ends the terms of current members of the Colorado
food systems advisory council (council). The bill provides for the
appointment of new members to the council.
The council's duties are to:
  • Collaborate and coordinate with producers, relevant state
and federal agencies, and consumers regarding linking
Colorado producers, particularly specialty crop producers,
with food and nutrition assistance programs;
  • Collaborate with relevant state and federal agencies and
other entities regarding the study, development, and
recommendation of policies and methods to best implement
the farm-to-school program;
  • Collaborate with producers, relevant government agencies,
educational institutions, nongovernmental organizations,
and consumers regarding support for the recommendations
in the Colorado blueprint for food and agriculture, and
ensure that the blueprint, or its successor, is updated as
needed;
  • Conduct research regarding national best practices
regarding food and nutrition assistance, direct and
intermediated market development, and farm-to-school
programs as well as other priorities determined by the
council;
  • Collaborate with, serve as a resource to, and receive input
from local and regional food policy councils in the state;
  • Explore methods of collecting and assessing statewide data
relating to council activities and report the relevant
information and data regarding council activities as
required by current law; and
  • Collaborate with the department of agriculture in
leveraging existing domestic marketing programs that
benefit Colorado agriculture.
The bill extends the repeal of the council from September 1, 2018,
to September 1, 2022.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 05/23/2017- Agriculture
Bill History

Concerning the Colorado food systems advisory council.

02/17/2017bFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 05/23/2017D. Coram (R)
R. Fields (D)
Agriculture, Livestock and Natural ResourcesbLobbyistsSenate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 05/04/2017State, Veterans, and Military AffairsVotes all Legislators02/17/2017

Concerning the Colorado food systems advisory council.

The bill repeals the interagency farm-to-school coordination task
force (task force) and ends the terms of current members of the Colorado
food systems advisory council (council). The bill provides for the
appointment of new members to the council.
The council's duties are to:
  • Collaborate and coordinate with producers, relevant state
and federal agencies, and consumers regarding linking
Colorado producers, particularly specialty crop producers,
with food and nutrition assistance programs;
  • Collaborate with relevant state and federal agencies and
other entities regarding the study, development, and
recommendation of policies and methods to best implement
the farm-to-school program;
  • Collaborate with producers, relevant government agencies,
educational institutions, nongovernmental organizations,
and consumers regarding support for the recommendations
in the Colorado blueprint for food and agriculture, and
ensure that the blueprint, or its successor, is updated as
needed;
  • Conduct research regarding national best practices
regarding food and nutrition assistance, direct and
intermediated market development, and farm-to-school
programs as well as other priorities determined by the
council;
  • Collaborate with, serve as a resource to, and receive input
from local and regional food policy councils in the state;
  • Explore methods of collecting and assessing statewide data
relating to council activities and report the relevant
information and data regarding council activities as
required by current law; and
  • Collaborate with the department of agriculture in
leveraging existing domestic marketing programs that
benefit Colorado agriculture.
The bill extends the repeal of the council from September 1, 2018,
to September 1, 2022.

C. Duran (D)
B. McLachlan (D)
Votes all Legislators
HB17-1242 New Transportation Infrastructure Funding Revenue Bill DocumentsSenate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely: 04/25/2017TransportationTransportation & EnergyR. Baumgardner (R)
K. Grantham (R)
C. Duran (D)
D. Mitsch Bush (D)

Section 15 of the bill requires a ballot question to be submitted to
the voters of the state at the November 2017 statewide election that seeks
approval for the state to temporarily increase the rate of the state sales and
use tax for 20 years beginning in 2018. If the voters approve the
temporary sales and use tax rate increase, the new revenue generated is
allocated solely for transportation infrastructure funding purposes, with
specific projects to be funded required to be included in the 2017 ballot
information booklet provided to the voters of the state, as follows:
  • $300 million annually to the state highway fund for use by
the department of transportation (CDOT); and
  • Of the remaining new revenue:
  • 70% to counties and municipalities in equal total
amounts; and
  • 30% to a newly created multimodal transportation
options fund (fund).
If the voters approve the temporary state sales and use tax rate
increase:
  • CDOT may issue up to a specified amount of transportation
revenue anticipation notes (TRANs) for the purpose of
funding transportation projects that are part of CDOT's
strategic transportation investment program and are on
CDOT's priority list for funding and the transportation
commission must covenant that amounts it allocates on an
annual basis to pay TRANs shall be paid: First, from $50
million from any legally available money under its control
other than the new sales and use tax revenue; next, from the
new sales and use tax revenue; and last, if necessary, from
any other legally available money under its control any
amount needed for payment of the TRANs until the
TRANs are fully repaid;
  • The revenue allocations to counties and municipalities are
further allocated to each county and municipality in
accordance with certain existing statutory formulas used to
allocate highway users tax fund (HUTF) money to each
county and municipality;
  • The existing statutory requirement that at least 10% of the
sales and use tax net revenue and other general fund
revenue that may be transferred or appropriated to the
HUTF and subsequently credited to the state highway fund
must be expended for transit purposes of transit-related
capital improvements is repealed;
  • A transportation options account and a pedestrian and
active transportation account are created in the fund and the
transportation commission is required to designate the
percentages of fund revenue to be credited to each account
subject to the limitations that for any given fiscal year no
more than 75% of the revenue may be credited to the
transportation options account and at least 25% of the
revenue must be credited to the pedestrian and active
transportation account;
  • A multimodal transportation options committee of
gubernatorial appointees representing transit agencies,
transportation planning organizations, local governments,
and CDOT is created as a type 1 agency within CDOT for
the purpose of allocating the money in the transportation
options account of the fund for transportation options
projects throughout the state. Under the supervision and
guidance of the committee, the transit and rail division of
CDOT is required to solicit, receive, and evaluate proposed
transportation options projects and propose funding for
interregional transportation options projects. Any
transportation options project receiving funding from the
transportation options account of the fund must also be
funded by at least an equal total amount of local
government, regional transportation authority, or transit
agency funding.
  • CDOT is required to allocate the money in the pedestrian
and active transportation account of the fund for projects
for transportation infrastructure that is designed for users
of nonmotorized mobility-enhancing equipment;
  • Transfers of 2% of general fund revenue to the HUTF that
are scheduled under current law to be made for state fiscal
years 2017-18, 2018-19, and 2019-20 are eliminated;
  • The state road safety surcharges imposed on motor vehicles
weighing 10,000 pounds or less are reduced for the same
period during which the rates of the state sales and use
taxes are increased. The resulting reduction in state fee
revenue is taken entirely from the share of such fee revenue
that is kept by the state so that county and municipal
allocations of such revenue are not reduced.
  • CDOT must annually report to the joint budget committee,
legislative audit committee, house transportation and
energy committee, and senate transportation committee
regarding its use of TRANs proceeds and must post the
reports and certain user-friendly project-specific
information on its website; and
  • The transportation revenue anticipation notes citizen
oversight committee is created to provide oversight of the
expenditure by the department of the proceeds of additional
TRANs. The committee must annually report to the
transportation legislation review committee regarding its
activities and findings.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 05/16/2017- Transportation & Motor Vehicles
Bill History

Concerning transportation funding.

03/08/2017bFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 05/16/2017R. Baumgardner (R)
K. Grantham (R)
Transportation & EnergybLobbyistsSenate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely: 04/25/2017TransportationVotes all Legislators03/08/2017

Concerning transportation funding.

Section 15 of the bill requires a ballot question to be submitted to
the voters of the state at the November 2017 statewide election that seeks
approval for the state to temporarily increase the rate of the state sales and
use tax for 20 years beginning in 2018. If the voters approve the
temporary sales and use tax rate increase, the new revenue generated is
allocated solely for transportation infrastructure funding purposes, with
specific projects to be funded required to be included in the 2017 ballot
information booklet provided to the voters of the state, as follows:
  • $300 million annually to the state highway fund for use by
the department of transportation (CDOT); and
  • Of the remaining new revenue:
  • 70% to counties and municipalities in equal total
amounts; and
  • 30% to a newly created multimodal transportation
options fund (fund).
If the voters approve the temporary state sales and use tax rate
increase:
  • CDOT may issue up to a specified amount of transportation
revenue anticipation notes (TRANs) for the purpose of
funding transportation projects that are part of CDOT's
strategic transportation investment program and are on
CDOT's priority list for funding and the transportation
commission must covenant that amounts it allocates on an
annual basis to pay TRANs shall be paid: First, from $50
million from any legally available money under its control
other than the new sales and use tax revenue; next, from the
new sales and use tax revenue; and last, if necessary, from
any other legally available money under its control any
amount needed for payment of the TRANs until the
TRANs are fully repaid;
  • The revenue allocations to counties and municipalities are
further allocated to each county and municipality in
accordance with certain existing statutory formulas used to
allocate highway users tax fund (HUTF) money to each
county and municipality;
  • The existing statutory requirement that at least 10% of the
sales and use tax net revenue and other general fund
revenue that may be transferred or appropriated to the
HUTF and subsequently credited to the state highway fund
must be expended for transit purposes of transit-related
capital improvements is repealed;
  • A transportation options account and a pedestrian and
active transportation account are created in the fund and the
transportation commission is required to designate the
percentages of fund revenue to be credited to each account
subject to the limitations that for any given fiscal year no
more than 75% of the revenue may be credited to the
transportation options account and at least 25% of the
revenue must be credited to the pedestrian and active
transportation account;
  • A multimodal transportation options committee of
gubernatorial appointees representing transit agencies,
transportation planning organizations, local governments,
and CDOT is created as a type 1 agency within CDOT for
the purpose of allocating the money in the transportation
options account of the fund for transportation options
projects throughout the state. Under the supervision and
guidance of the committee, the transit and rail division of
CDOT is required to solicit, receive, and evaluate proposed
transportation options projects and propose funding for
interregional transportation options projects. Any
transportation options project receiving funding from the
transportation options account of the fund must also be
funded by at least an equal total amount of local
government, regional transportation authority, or transit
agency funding.
  • CDOT is required to allocate the money in the pedestrian
and active transportation account of the fund for projects
for transportation infrastructure that is designed for users
of nonmotorized mobility-enhancing equipment;
  • Transfers of 2% of general fund revenue to the HUTF that
are scheduled under current law to be made for state fiscal
years 2017-18, 2018-19, and 2019-20 are eliminated;
  • The state road safety surcharges imposed on motor vehicles
weighing 10,000 pounds or less are reduced for the same
period during which the rates of the state sales and use
taxes are increased. The resulting reduction in state fee
revenue is taken entirely from the share of such fee revenue
that is kept by the state so that county and municipal
allocations of such revenue are not reduced.
  • CDOT must annually report to the joint budget committee,
legislative audit committee, house transportation and
energy committee, and senate transportation committee
regarding its use of TRANs proceeds and must post the
reports and certain user-friendly project-specific
information on its website; and
  • The transportation revenue anticipation notes citizen
oversight committee is created to provide oversight of the
expenditure by the department of the proceeds of additional
TRANs. The committee must annually report to the
transportation legislation review committee regarding its
activities and findings.

C. Duran (D)
D. Mitsch Bush (D)
Votes all Legislators
HB17-1306 Test Lead In Public Schools' Drinking Water Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 06/08/2017Health and Human ServicesEducationD. Coram (R)
K. Donovan (D)
T. Exum Sr. (D)
B. McLachlan (D)

The bill directs the department of public health and environment
(department) to establish a grant program to test for lead in public
schools' drinking water. The department will give the highest priority to
the oldest public elementary schools, then the oldest public schools that
are not elementary schools, and then all other public schools. The
department may also consider ability to pay in administering the program.
The department is directed to use its best efforts to complete all testing
and analysis by June 30, 2020. The public school must provide at least
10% local matching funds and give the test results to its local public
health agency, its supplier of water, its school board, and the department.
The department may use up to $300,000 per year for 3 years for grants
beginning on or after July 1, 2017, from the water quality improvement
fund if there is money available after fully funding existing programs.
The department shall provide 4 annual reports to the general assembly
regarding implementation of the grant program, including any legislative
proposals that may be warranted.
The bill appropriates $440,000 and 1.0 FTE to the department of
public health and environment for the implementation of the act.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/14/2017- Natural Resources & Environment
Bill History

Concerning the financing of testing for lead in public schools' drinking water, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.

03/29/2017bFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/14/2017D. Coram (R)
K. Donovan (D)
EducationbLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 06/08/2017Health and Human ServicesVotes all Legislators03/29/2017

Concerning the financing of testing for lead in public schools' drinking water, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.

The bill directs the department of public health and environment
(department) to establish a grant program to test for lead in public
schools' drinking water. The department will give the highest priority to
the oldest public elementary schools, then the oldest public schools that
are not elementary schools, and then all other public schools. The
department may also consider ability to pay in administering the program.
The department is directed to use its best efforts to complete all testing
and analysis by June 30, 2020. The public school must provide at least
10% local matching funds and give the test results to its local public
health agency, its supplier of water, its school board, and the department.
The department may use up to $300,000 per year for 3 years for grants
beginning on or after July 1, 2017, from the water quality improvement
fund if there is money available after fully funding existing programs.
The department shall provide 4 annual reports to the general assembly
regarding implementation of the grant program, including any legislative
proposals that may be warranted.
The bill appropriates $440,000 and 1.0 FTE to the department of
public health and environment for the implementation of the act.

T. Exum Sr. (D)
B. McLachlan (D)
Votes all Legislators
HB17-1321 Parks And Wildlife Financial Sustainability Bill DocumentsSenate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely: 05/04/2017FinanceAgriculture, Livestock and Natural ResourcesD. Coram (R)
S. Fenberg (D)
J. Wilson (R)
J. Arndt (D)

Section 1 of the bill provides a nonstatutory legislative declaration.
Section 2 adds voucher and preference point to the documents
listed under the definition of license.
Sections 3 and 17 add sponsorships and donations to the list
of money transfers that the parks and wildlife commission (commission)
is authorized to receive and expend.
Section 4 prohibits the commission from using revenue generated
from increased license fee amounts authorized by the bill for the purchase
of any fee title interest in real property or any interest in water.
Section 6 clarifies that the Colorado outdoor recreation search and
rescue card fee is nonrefundable.
Sections 7, 14, 15, and 18 raise the maximum fee amounts that the
commission may assess by rule for certain licenses, permits, and passes.
Sections 7, 14, 15, and 18 also authorize the commission to apply a
consumer price index adjustment to a fee that has been set at the
maximum fee amount allowed, which fee adjustment does not count
toward the maximum fee amounts set.
Section 8 allows the division of parks and wildlife (division) to
grant up to 25% of the money derived from sales of the state migratory
waterfowl stamp to nonprofit organizations implementing the North
American waterfowl management plan.
Section 9 removes references to the fee assessed for the youth
small game hunting license since the maximum fee amount for the license
is listed in another part of statute. Section 9 also authorizes the
commission to establish by rule a special licensing program for young
adult hunters and anglers and requires that, if the commission establishes
such a licensing program by rule, the commission must define young
adult in a manner that does not include adults 26 years of age or older.
Section 10 changes the name of the wildlife management public
education advisory council to the wildlife council.
Section 11 requires the division to prepare reports on the status of
certain license fee increases that the commission is authorized to
promulgate pursuant to the bill and nonconsumptive users' use of
division-managed land, and to present the reports to the agriculture
committees in the house of representatives and the senate.
Section 12 increases the fine imposed against a person who
violates a wildlife statute or rule that does not have a specific penalty
listed for the violation from $50 to $100.
Section 13 raises the penalty for a number of
wildlife-license-related offenses to an amount equal to twice the cost of
the most expensive license for the species. Section 13 also clarifies that
engaging in conduct that requires a license without a license is a violation
subject to an assessment of 10 license suspension points and a fine
amount equal to twice the cost of the most expensive license issued for
the activity that the person unlawfully engaged in without the requisite
license; except that a violation based on fishing without a license is
subject to a $125 fine and an assessment of 10 license suspension points.
Section 23 requires a person to purchase an aquatic nuisance
species sticker to operate or use a vessel on the waters of the state or
possess a vessel at a vessel staging area. The fees collected on the sale of
aquatic nuisance species stickers are credited to the division of parks and
wildlife aquatic nuisance species fund to help fund inspections of vessels
and associated conveyances for the presence of aquatic nuisance species,
decontamination of vessels or conveyances with the presence of aquatic
nuisance species, lake monitoring for the presence of aquatic nuisance
species, and outreach efforts.
Under current law, pass or registration is defined as a
document issued by the division authorizing the use of land or water
under the division's control. Section 16 adds sticker to the definition to
encompass the aquatic nuisance species sticker created in section 23.
Section 19 establishes that a violation of the requirement to obtain
an aquatic nuisance species sticker is a class 2 petty offense, punishable
by a fine equal to twice the cost of a nonresident motorboat or sailboat
aquatic nuisance species sticker.
Section 20 repeals the division of wildlife aquatic nuisance species
fund and renames the division of parks and outdoor recreation aquatic
nuisance species fund as the division of parks and wildlife aquatic
nuisance species fund, combining the 2 existing funds into one fund.
Sections 5 and 26 make conforming amendments regarding the
combining of the 2 funds into one renamed fund.
Section 21 removes the $5 cap on the fee that the division may
charge a person for replacement of a lost or destroyed pass or registration.
The fee is set at 50% of the cost of the original pass or registration.
Section 22 defines nonmotorboat.
Section 24 changes the penalty for a violation of statutes and rules
concerning parks and recreation for which a specific penalty is not listed
from a class 2 petty offense to a misdemeanor and raises the fine from
$50 to $100.
Section 25 establishes that engaging in conduct that requires a
permit, pass, or sticker issued by the division without a permit, pass, or
sticker is a violation subject to a fine amount equal to twice the cost of the
most expensive permit, pass, or sticker issued for the activity that the
person unlawfully engaged in without the requisite permit, pass, or
sticker.
1

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/14/2017- Natural Resources & Environment
Bill History

Concerning the parks and wildlife commission's authority to set certain charges assessed on people engaging in activities regulated by the division of parks and wildlife, and, in connection therewith, setting certain hunting, fishing, parks, and recreation fees and fines, creating an aquatic nuisance species sticker and associated fee structure, and requiring reporting by the division of parks and wildlife on fee amounts and the use of division-managed lands by nonconsumptive users.

04/05/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/14/2017D. Coram (R)
S. Fenberg (D)
Agriculture, Livestock and Natural ResourcescLobbyistsSenate Committee on Finance Postpone Indefinitely: 05/04/2017FinanceVotes all Legislators04/05/2017

Concerning the parks and wildlife commission's authority to set certain charges assessed on people engaging in activities regulated by the division of parks and wildlife, and, in connection therewith, setting certain hunting, fishing, parks, and recreation fees and fines, creating an aquatic nuisance species sticker and associated fee structure, and requiring reporting by the division of parks and wildlife on fee amounts and the use of division-managed lands by nonconsumptive users.

Section 1 of the bill provides a nonstatutory legislative declaration.
Section 2 adds voucher and preference point to the documents
listed under the definition of license.
Sections 3 and 17 add sponsorships and donations to the list
of money transfers that the parks and wildlife commission (commission)
is authorized to receive and expend.
Section 4 prohibits the commission from using revenue generated
from increased license fee amounts authorized by the bill for the purchase
of any fee title interest in real property or any interest in water.
Section 6 clarifies that the Colorado outdoor recreation search and
rescue card fee is nonrefundable.
Sections 7, 14, 15, and 18 raise the maximum fee amounts that the
commission may assess by rule for certain licenses, permits, and passes.
Sections 7, 14, 15, and 18 also authorize the commission to apply a
consumer price index adjustment to a fee that has been set at the
maximum fee amount allowed, which fee adjustment does not count
toward the maximum fee amounts set.
Section 8 allows the division of parks and wildlife (division) to
grant up to 25% of the money derived from sales of the state migratory
waterfowl stamp to nonprofit organizations implementing the North
American waterfowl management plan.
Section 9 removes references to the fee assessed for the youth
small game hunting license since the maximum fee amount for the license
is listed in another part of statute. Section 9 also authorizes the
commission to establish by rule a special licensing program for young
adult hunters and anglers and requires that, if the commission establishes
such a licensing program by rule, the commission must define young
adult in a manner that does not include adults 26 years of age or older.
Section 10 changes the name of the wildlife management public
education advisory council to the wildlife council.
Section 11 requires the division to prepare reports on the status of
certain license fee increases that the commission is authorized to
promulgate pursuant to the bill and nonconsumptive users' use of
division-managed land, and to present the reports to the agriculture
committees in the house of representatives and the senate.
Section 12 increases the fine imposed against a person who
violates a wildlife statute or rule that does not have a specific penalty
listed for the violation from $50 to $100.
Section 13 raises the penalty for a number of
wildlife-license-related offenses to an amount equal to twice the cost of
the most expensive license for the species. Section 13 also clarifies that
engaging in conduct that requires a license without a license is a violation
subject to an assessment of 10 license suspension points and a fine
amount equal to twice the cost of the most expensive license issued for
the activity that the person unlawfully engaged in without the requisite
license; except that a violation based on fishing without a license is
subject to a $125 fine and an assessment of 10 license suspension points.
Section 23 requires a person to purchase an aquatic nuisance
species sticker to operate or use a vessel on the waters of the state or
possess a vessel at a vessel staging area. The fees collected on the sale of
aquatic nuisance species stickers are credited to the division of parks and
wildlife aquatic nuisance species fund to help fund inspections of vessels
and associated conveyances for the presence of aquatic nuisance species,
decontamination of vessels or conveyances with the presence of aquatic
nuisance species, lake monitoring for the presence of aquatic nuisance
species, and outreach efforts.
Under current law, pass or registration is defined as a
document issued by the division authorizing the use of land or water
under the division's control. Section 16 adds sticker to the definition to
encompass the aquatic nuisance species sticker created in section 23.
Section 19 establishes that a violation of the requirement to obtain
an aquatic nuisance species sticker is a class 2 petty offense, punishable
by a fine equal to twice the cost of a nonresident motorboat or sailboat
aquatic nuisance species sticker.
Section 20 repeals the division of wildlife aquatic nuisance species
fund and renames the division of parks and outdoor recreation aquatic
nuisance species fund as the division of parks and wildlife aquatic
nuisance species fund, combining the 2 existing funds into one fund.
Sections 5 and 26 make conforming amendments regarding the
combining of the 2 funds into one renamed fund.
Section 21 removes the $5 cap on the fee that the division may
charge a person for replacement of a lost or destroyed pass or registration.
The fee is set at 50% of the cost of the original pass or registration.
Section 22 defines nonmotorboat.
Section 24 changes the penalty for a violation of statutes and rules
concerning parks and recreation for which a specific penalty is not listed
from a class 2 petty offense to a misdemeanor and raises the fine from
$50 to $100.
Section 25 establishes that engaging in conduct that requires a
permit, pass, or sticker issued by the division without a permit, pass, or
sticker is a violation subject to a fine amount equal to twice the cost of the
most expensive permit, pass, or sticker issued for the activity that the
person unlawfully engaged in without the requisite permit, pass, or
sticker.
1

J. Wilson (R)
J. Arndt (D)
Votes all Legislators
SB17-004 Access To Providers For Medicaid Recipients Bill DocumentsHouse Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 04/19/2017Health and Human ServicesState, Veterans, & Military AffairsJ. Tate (R)C. Wist (R)

Under current law, recipients of services under the Colorado
medical assistance program (medicaid) are not responsible for the cost of
services by a medical provider or the cost remaining after payment by
medicaid or another private insurer, regardless of whether the medical
provider is enrolled in the medicaid program, unless the medical services
provided are nonreimbursable by medicaid. The bill amends the statute
so that the prohibition on charging medicaid recipients for medical
services applies only if the medical provider is enrolled in medicaid.
Prior to providing medical services to a medicaid recipient, a
nonenrolled provider must enter into a written agreement with the
recipient as specified in the bill. If the requirements are met, the medicaid
recipient would be responsible for the cost of the medical services.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/26/2017- Health Care & Health Insurance
- Public Health
- State Government
Bill History

Concerning access by medicaid recipients to nonenrolled medical providers.

01/11/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/26/2017J. Tate (R)State, Veterans, & Military AffairscLobbyistsHouse Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 04/19/2017Health and Human ServicesVotes all Legislators01/11/2017

Concerning access by medicaid recipients to nonenrolled medical providers.

Under current law, recipients of services under the Colorado
medical assistance program (medicaid) are not responsible for the cost of
services by a medical provider or the cost remaining after payment by
medicaid or another private insurer, regardless of whether the medical
provider is enrolled in the medicaid program, unless the medical services
provided are nonreimbursable by medicaid. The bill amends the statute
so that the prohibition on charging medicaid recipients for medical
services applies only if the medical provider is enrolled in medicaid.
Prior to providing medical services to a medicaid recipient, a
nonenrolled provider must enter into a written agreement with the
recipient as specified in the bill. If the requirements are met, the medicaid
recipient would be responsible for the cost of the medical services.

C. Wist (R)Votes all Legislators
SB17-091 Allow Medicaid Home Health Services In Community Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 06/05/2017Health and Human ServicesHealth, Insurance, & EnvironmentL. Crowder (R)
D. Moreno (D)
J. Ginal (D)

Under current law, for some clients, home health services under
the medicaid program may only be provided in the client's residence. The
bill removes the location restriction for home health services to comply
with changes to federal medicaid rules that allow for services to be
delivered in the community as well as the residence.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 03/08/2017- Health Care & Health Insurance
- Human Services
Bill History

Concerning allowing medicaid home health services to be provided in the community.

01/18/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 03/08/2017L. Crowder (R)
D. Moreno (D)
Health, Insurance, & EnvironmentcLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 06/05/2017Health and Human ServicesVotes all Legislators01/18/2017

Concerning allowing medicaid home health services to be provided in the community.

Under current law, for some clients, home health services under
the medicaid program may only be provided in the client's residence. The
bill removes the location restriction for home health services to comply
with changes to federal medicaid rules that allow for services to be
delivered in the community as well as the residence.

J. Ginal (D)Votes all Legislators
SB17-098 Mobile Home Parks Bill DocumentsSenate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 02/13/2017State, Veterans, and Military AffairsJ. Kefalas (D)J. Ginal (D)

Notice of sale of a mobile home park. Where the home owners
within a mobile home park (park) have formed either a homeowners'
association or a cooperative, section 2 of the bill specifies that, not less
than 30 days nor more than one year prior to, an owner of a park either
entering into a written listing agreement for the sale of the park or making
an offer to sell the park to any party must provide written notice to the
president, secretary, and treasurer of any homeowners' association or
cooperative of the owner's intention to sell the park. The bill specifies
certain circumstances in which the park owner is not required to satisfy
these notice requirements.
During the notice period required by the bill, the owner or
management of the park may consider any offer to purchase the park that
has been made by a homeowners' association or cooperative of such home
owners as long as the association or cooperative is open to all home
owners. The owner of the park may consider any reasonable offer made
by an association or cooperative representing the home owners and
negotiate in good faith with them. If an agreement to purchase the
community is reached during the notice period specified in the bill, the
association or cooperative has a reasonable time beyond the expiration of
such period, if necessary, to obtain financing for the purchase. The bill
explicitly specifies that these provisions do not give any home owner or
group of home owners within a park any right of first refusal.
Terms of written rental agreement. Section 3 permits a written
rental agreement for a tenancy in a park to contain a clause that
encourages the use of mediation or another form of alternative dispute
resolution to resolve any controversy by or among owners, management,
and home owners within parks.
Alternative dispute resolution. In any controversy between
management and a home owner of a park arising out of the bill, except for
the nonpayment of rent or in cases in which the health or safety of other
home owners is in imminent danger, section 4 permits the parties to
submit the dispute to another form of alternative dispute resolution in
addition to mediation prior to the filing of a forcible entry and detainer
lawsuit. The choice of alternative dispute resolution methods is dependent
upon agreement of the parties.
Under section 4, the general assembly also encourages the owners
and management of parks and home owners within such parks to make
use of the state office of dispute resolution to resolve any controversy by
or among them in addition to local government agencies and
community-based nonprofit organizations that are created and empowered
to mediate disputes between or among the owners and management of
parks and home owners within such parks.
Subtraction of gain from sale of park from calculation of
federal taxable income for state income tax purposes. For income tax
years commencing on or after January 1, 2018, section 5 subtracts from
federal taxable income the following amount of the gain recognized from
the sale or exchange of a park where the party purchasing the park is a
county, municipality, local housing authority, nonprofit corporation,
homeowners' association, or a cooperative:
  • 100% of the recognized gain for a mobile home park with
50 or fewer lots; and
  • 50% of the recognized gain for a mobile home park with
more than 50 lots.
Encouragement of the preservation and development of mobile
and manufactured home parks through county and municipal master
plans.
Recognizing the importance of manufactured housing as an option
for many households, under sections 6 and 7, counties and
municipalities, as applicable, are required to encourage through either
their master plans or other land use or planning documents adopted by the
particular governmental body the preservation of existing parks and the
development of new manufactured home parks within their territorial
boundaries, including increasing opportunities for parks that are owned
by the owners of homes within the park. Whenever an existing park is
located in a hazardous area, the county or municipality, as applicable, is
required to make every reasonable effort to reduce or eliminate the
hazard, when feasible, or to help mitigate the loss of housing through the
relocation of affected households.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/15/2017- Housing
- Local Government
Bill History

Concerning mobile home parks, and, in connection therewith, promoting home ownership, protecting property rights, and providing incentives to local governments to preserve and develop mobile home park communities.

01/27/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/15/2017J. Kefalas (D)cLobbyistsSenate Committee on State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Postpone Indefinitely: 02/13/2017State, Veterans, and Military AffairsVotes all Legislators01/27/2017

Concerning mobile home parks, and, in connection therewith, promoting home ownership, protecting property rights, and providing incentives to local governments to preserve and develop mobile home park communities.

Notice of sale of a mobile home park. Where the home owners
within a mobile home park (park) have formed either a homeowners'
association or a cooperative, section 2 of the bill specifies that, not less
than 30 days nor more than one year prior to, an owner of a park either
entering into a written listing agreement for the sale of the park or making
an offer to sell the park to any party must provide written notice to the
president, secretary, and treasurer of any homeowners' association or
cooperative of the owner's intention to sell the park. The bill specifies
certain circumstances in which the park owner is not required to satisfy
these notice requirements.
During the notice period required by the bill, the owner or
management of the park may consider any offer to purchase the park that
has been made by a homeowners' association or cooperative of such home
owners as long as the association or cooperative is open to all home
owners. The owner of the park may consider any reasonable offer made
by an association or cooperative representing the home owners and
negotiate in good faith with them. If an agreement to purchase the
community is reached during the notice period specified in the bill, the
association or cooperative has a reasonable time beyond the expiration of
such period, if necessary, to obtain financing for the purchase. The bill
explicitly specifies that these provisions do not give any home owner or
group of home owners within a park any right of first refusal.
Terms of written rental agreement. Section 3 permits a written
rental agreement for a tenancy in a park to contain a clause that
encourages the use of mediation or another form of alternative dispute
resolution to resolve any controversy by or among owners, management,
and home owners within parks.
Alternative dispute resolution. In any controversy between
management and a home owner of a park arising out of the bill, except for
the nonpayment of rent or in cases in which the health or safety of other
home owners is in imminent danger, section 4 permits the parties to
submit the dispute to another form of alternative dispute resolution in
addition to mediation prior to the filing of a forcible entry and detainer
lawsuit. The choice of alternative dispute resolution methods is dependent
upon agreement of the parties.
Under section 4, the general assembly also encourages the owners
and management of parks and home owners within such parks to make
use of the state office of dispute resolution to resolve any controversy by
or among them in addition to local government agencies and
community-based nonprofit organizations that are created and empowered
to mediate disputes between or among the owners and management of
parks and home owners within such parks.
Subtraction of gain from sale of park from calculation of
federal taxable income for state income tax purposes. For income tax
years commencing on or after January 1, 2018, section 5 subtracts from
federal taxable income the following amount of the gain recognized from
the sale or exchange of a park where the party purchasing the park is a
county, municipality, local housing authority, nonprofit corporation,
homeowners' association, or a cooperative:
  • 100% of the recognized gain for a mobile home park with
50 or fewer lots; and
  • 50% of the recognized gain for a mobile home park with
more than 50 lots.
Encouragement of the preservation and development of mobile
and manufactured home parks through county and municipal master
plans.
Recognizing the importance of manufactured housing as an option
for many households, under sections 6 and 7, counties and
municipalities, as applicable, are required to encourage through either
their master plans or other land use or planning documents adopted by the
particular governmental body the preservation of existing parks and the
development of new manufactured home parks within their territorial
boundaries, including increasing opportunities for parks that are owned
by the owners of homes within the park. Whenever an existing park is
located in a hazardous area, the county or municipality, as applicable, is
required to make every reasonable effort to reduce or eliminate the
hazard, when feasible, or to help mitigate the loss of housing through the
relocation of affected households.

J. Ginal (D)Votes all Legislators
SB17-121 Improve Medicaid Client Correspondence Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 06/02/2017Health and Human ServicesHealth, Insurance, & EnvironmentK. Lundberg (R)
L. Crowder (R)
L. Landgraf (R)
J. Danielson (D)

Interim Study Committee on Communication Between the
Department of Health Care Policy and Financing (HCPF) and
Medicaid Clients.
The bill requires the department of health care policy
and financing (department) to engage in an ongoing process to improve
medicaid client communications, including client letters and notices, that
concern eligibility for or the denial, reduction, suspension, or termination
of a benefit. Among other requirements included in the bill, the
department shall ensure that client communications are accurate,
readable, and understandable, clearly conveying the purpose of the letter
or notice and the specific action or actions that the client must take in
response to the letter or notice.
The bill requires the department to include in certain notices a
specific and plain language explanation of the basis for the denial,
reduction, suspension, or termination of a benefit; specific and detailed
information concerning household composition, income sources and
amounts, and assets; and a description of necessary information or
documents that the client has not provided.
To the extent practicable, the department shall test new or
significantly revised client communications against the requirements
included in the bill with a representative sample of medicaid clients,
advocacy organizations, and counties prior to implementing the client
communications. As part of the testing, the department shall solicit
feedback from a workgroup established by the department to provide
customer and community partner feedback regarding client
communications.
The department shall also ensure that letters and notices affecting
clients with disabilities, seniors, and other vulnerable populations are
appropriately prioritized for improvement consistent with the
requirements in the bill. The department shall receive feedback from the
workgroup established to provide customer and community partner
feedback regarding client communications as part of the department's
involvement in state-level decision-making relating to computer system
changes and training.
The department shall provide information concerning medicaid
client communications improvements as part of its annual presentation to
its legislative committee of reference.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 08/14/2017- Health Care & Health Insurance
Bill History

Concerning improving medicaid client correspondence.

01/27/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 08/14/2017K. Lundberg (R)
L. Crowder (R)
Health, Insurance, & EnvironmentcLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 06/02/2017Health and Human ServicesVotes all Legislators01/27/2017

Concerning improving medicaid client correspondence.

Interim Study Committee on Communication Between the
Department of Health Care Policy and Financing (HCPF) and
Medicaid Clients.
The bill requires the department of health care policy
and financing (department) to engage in an ongoing process to improve
medicaid client communications, including client letters and notices, that
concern eligibility for or the denial, reduction, suspension, or termination
of a benefit. Among other requirements included in the bill, the
department shall ensure that client communications are accurate,
readable, and understandable, clearly conveying the purpose of the letter
or notice and the specific action or actions that the client must take in
response to the letter or notice.
The bill requires the department to include in certain notices a
specific and plain language explanation of the basis for the denial,
reduction, suspension, or termination of a benefit; specific and detailed
information concerning household composition, income sources and
amounts, and assets; and a description of necessary information or
documents that the client has not provided.
To the extent practicable, the department shall test new or
significantly revised client communications against the requirements
included in the bill with a representative sample of medicaid clients,
advocacy organizations, and counties prior to implementing the client
communications. As part of the testing, the department shall solicit
feedback from a workgroup established by the department to provide
customer and community partner feedback regarding client
communications.
The department shall also ensure that letters and notices affecting
clients with disabilities, seniors, and other vulnerable populations are
appropriately prioritized for improvement consistent with the
requirements in the bill. The department shall receive feedback from the
workgroup established to provide customer and community partner
feedback regarding client communications as part of the department's
involvement in state-level decision-making relating to computer system
changes and training.
The department shall provide information concerning medicaid
client communications improvements as part of its annual presentation to
its legislative committee of reference.

L. Landgraf (R)
J. Danielson (D)
Votes all Legislators
SB17-137 Sunset Health Service Corps Advisory Council Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 04/18/2017EducationHealth, Insurance, & EnvironmentM. Merrifield (D)
N. Todd (D)
D. Jackson (D)

Sunset Process - Senate Education Committee. The Colorado
health service corps advisory council reviews applications and makes
recommendations for participation in the Colorado health service corps
program (program). The program awards educational loan repayment for
medical professionals who agree to provide primary health services in
federally designated health professional shortage areas in Colorado.
The bill continues the Colorado health service corps advisory
council indefinitely.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/21/2017- Health Care & Health Insurance
- Higher Education
Bill History

Concerning the continuation of the Colorado health service corps advisory council.

01/31/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/21/2017M. Merrifield (D)
N. Todd (D)
Health, Insurance, & EnvironmentcLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 04/18/2017EducationVotes all Legislators01/31/2017

Concerning the continuation of the Colorado health service corps advisory council.

Sunset Process - Senate Education Committee. The Colorado
health service corps advisory council reviews applications and makes
recommendations for participation in the Colorado health service corps
program (program). The program awards educational loan repayment for
medical professionals who agree to provide primary health services in
federally designated health professional shortage areas in Colorado.
The bill continues the Colorado health service corps advisory
council indefinitely.

D. Jackson (D)Votes all Legislators
SB17-205 Multimodal Transportation Infrastructure Funding Bill DocumentsSenate Committee on Transportation Postpone Indefinitely: 04/04/2017TransportationJ. Kefalas (D)P. Rosenthal (D)

In 1999, the voters of the state authorized the executive director of
the department of transportation (CDOT) to issue transportation revenue
anticipation notes (TRANs) in a maximum principal amount of $1.7
billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $2.3 billion in order to
provide financing to accelerate the construction of qualified federal aid
transportation projects. The executive director of CDOT issued the
TRANs as authorized. The final payments of principal and interest on the
TRANs will be made during fiscal year 2016-17, which will make
available for expenditure for transportation-related purposes only
revenues dedicated for transportation by federal law, the state
constitution, and state law that the state has been using to make principal
and interest payments on the TRANs.
Section 9 requires the state transportation commission to submit
a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017, 2018, or
2019 election, which, if approved, would increase the state sales and use
tax from 2.9% to 3.15%, beginning on the July 1 immediately following
the applicable election and would authorize the executive director of
CDOT to issue additional TRANs in a maximum principal amount of $4
billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $5.75 billion. If the voters
approve the ballot question, sections 3, 4, 5, and 7 implement the
increase in the state sales and use tax rate. The additional TRANs must
have a maximum repayment term of 20 years, and the certificate, trust
indenture, or other instrument authorizing their issuance must provide that
the state may pay them in full before the end of the specified payment
term without penalty. Additional TRANs must otherwise generally be
issued subject to the same requirements and for the same purposes as the
original TRANs; except that the transportation commission must pledge
to annually allocate from legally available money under its control any
money needed for payment of the notes in excess of amounts appropriated
by the general assembly from the state highway fund for payment of the
notes as authorized by section 5 until the notes are fully repaid.
Section 10 specifies that at least $500 million of TRANs proceeds
shall be used only for passenger rail service in the interstate 25 corridor
and that remaining TRANs proceeds shall be used only to fund projects
on CDOT's priority list for transportation funding. Section 10 also
specifies additional transportation project contract award process
requirements and limitations for a project to be funded in whole or in part
with proceeds of additional TRANs.
Sections 6 and 8 require all state sales and use tax net revenue that
is attributable to any increase in the state sales and use tax rate resulting
from the approval of the ballot question submitted pursuant to section 9
to be credited to the HUTF, paid from the HUTF to the state highway
fund for use, subject to annual appropriation by the general assembly, for
payment of TRANs and, to the extent not used for that purpose, state
transportation projects.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/20/2017- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Transportation & Motor Vehicles
Bill History

Concerning multimodal transportation infrastructure funding, and, in connection therewith, requiring the transportation commission to submit a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017, 2018, or 2019 election, which, if approved, would authorize the state to increase the rate of the state sales and use taxes from two and nine-tenths percent to three and fifteen one-hundredths percent and to issue additional transportation revenue anticipation notes for the purpose of addressing critical priority multimodal transportation needs in the state by financing transportation projects, including passenger rail, and would exclude the additional sales and use tax revenue and note proceeds and investment earnings on note proceeds from state fiscal year spending limits.

02/28/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 06/20/2017J. Kefalas (D)cLobbyistsSenate Committee on Transportation Postpone Indefinitely: 04/04/2017TransportationVotes all Legislators02/28/2017

Concerning multimodal transportation infrastructure funding, and, in connection therewith, requiring the transportation commission to submit a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017, 2018, or 2019 election, which, if approved, would authorize the state to increase the rate of the state sales and use taxes from two and nine-tenths percent to three and fifteen one-hundredths percent and to issue additional transportation revenue anticipation notes for the purpose of addressing critical priority multimodal transportation needs in the state by financing transportation projects, including passenger rail, and would exclude the additional sales and use tax revenue and note proceeds and investment earnings on note proceeds from state fiscal year spending limits.

In 1999, the voters of the state authorized the executive director of
the department of transportation (CDOT) to issue transportation revenue
anticipation notes (TRANs) in a maximum principal amount of $1.7
billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $2.3 billion in order to
provide financing to accelerate the construction of qualified federal aid
transportation projects. The executive director of CDOT issued the
TRANs as authorized. The final payments of principal and interest on the
TRANs will be made during fiscal year 2016-17, which will make
available for expenditure for transportation-related purposes only
revenues dedicated for transportation by federal law, the state
constitution, and state law that the state has been using to make principal
and interest payments on the TRANs.
Section 9 requires the state transportation commission to submit
a ballot question to the voters of the state at the November 2017, 2018, or
2019 election, which, if approved, would increase the state sales and use
tax from 2.9% to 3.15%, beginning on the July 1 immediately following
the applicable election and would authorize the executive director of
CDOT to issue additional TRANs in a maximum principal amount of $4
billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $5.75 billion. If the voters
approve the ballot question, sections 3, 4, 5, and 7 implement the
increase in the state sales and use tax rate. The additional TRANs must
have a maximum repayment term of 20 years, and the certificate, trust
indenture, or other instrument authorizing their issuance must provide that
the state may pay them in full before the end of the specified payment
term without penalty. Additional TRANs must otherwise generally be
issued subject to the same requirements and for the same purposes as the
original TRANs; except that the transportation commission must pledge
to annually allocate from legally available money under its control any
money needed for payment of the notes in excess of amounts appropriated
by the general assembly from the state highway fund for payment of the
notes as authorized by section 5 until the notes are fully repaid.
Section 10 specifies that at least $500 million of TRANs proceeds
shall be used only for passenger rail service in the interstate 25 corridor
and that remaining TRANs proceeds shall be used only to fund projects
on CDOT's priority list for transportation funding. Section 10 also
specifies additional transportation project contract award process
requirements and limitations for a project to be funded in whole or in part
with proceeds of additional TRANs.
Sections 6 and 8 require all state sales and use tax net revenue that
is attributable to any increase in the state sales and use tax rate resulting
from the approval of the ballot question submitted pursuant to section 9
to be credited to the HUTF, paid from the HUTF to the state highway
fund for use, subject to annual appropriation by the general assembly, for
payment of TRANs and, to the extent not used for that purpose, state
transportation projects.

P. Rosenthal (D)Votes all Legislators
SB17-267 Sustainability Of Rural Colorado Bill DocumentsGovernor Signed: 05/30/2017FinanceFinanceL. Guzman (D)
J. Sonnenberg (R)
J. Becker (R)
K. Becker (D)

Section 3 of the bill eliminates annual statutory transfers of
general fund revenue to the highway users tax fund (HUTF) and the
capital construction fund for state fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, and
2019-20. Section 1 makes statutory general fund transfers to the state
public school fund in amounts equal to the amounts of the eliminated
statutory transfers to the HUTF for the sole purpose of reducing,
proportionally to the extent feasible, the financial impacts of inconsistent
funding of the state share of district total program on rural and small rural
school districts.
Section 2 requires executive branch departments to submit
2018-19 budget requests to the office of state planning and budgeting
(OSPB) that are at least 2% lower than their 2017-18 budgets. The OSPB
must strongly consider the budget reduction proposals made by each
department when preparing the annual executive budget proposals to the
general assembly and shall seek to ensure that the executive budget
proposal for each department is at least 2% lower than the department's
actual budget for the 2017-18 fiscal year.
Section 5 authorizes the state to execute lease-purchase
agreements for eligible state facilities to generate up to $1.35 billion of
net proceeds, with maximum annual lease payments of $100 million for
up to 20 years. Lease payments must be paid first from any legally
available money under the control of the transportation commission and
next from the general fund or any other legally available source of money.
$1.2 billion of the net proceeds are credited to the HUTF and allocated to
the state highway fund and $150 million of the net proceeds are credited
to the capital construction fund, with such amounts being reduced
proportionally if the full $1.35 billion of net proceeds is not received. As
specified in section 19, the department of transportation (CDOT) may use
the net proceeds only for qualified federal aid highway projects, with at
least 25% of the money being used for projects that are located in
counties with populations of 50,000 or less.
Section 6 creates the Colorado healthcare affordability and
sustainability enterprise (enterprise) as a type 2 agency and
government-owned business within the department of health care policy
and financing (HCPF) for the purpose of participating in the
implementation and administration of a Colorado healthcare affordability
and sustainability program (program) on and after July 1, 2017, and
creates a board consisting of 13 members appointed by the governor with
the advice and consent of the senate to govern the enterprise. The
business purpose of the enterprise is, in exchange for the payment of a
new healthcare affordability and sustainability fee (fee) by hospitals to the
enterprise, to administer the program and thereby support hospitals that
provide uncompensated medical services to uninsured patients and
participate in publicly funded health insurance programs by:
  • Participating in a federal program that provides additional
matching money to states;
  • Using fee revenue, which must be credited to a newly
created healthcare affordability and sustainability fee fund
and used solely for purposes of the program, and federal
matching money to:
  • Reduce the amount of uncompensated care that
hospitals provide by increasing the number of
individuals covered by publicly funded health
insurance; and
  • Increase publicly funded insurance reimbursement
rates to hospitals; and
  • Providing or contracting for or arranging advisory and
consulting services to hospitals and coordinating services
to hospitals to help them more effectively and efficiently
participate in publicly funded insurance programs.
The bill does not take effect if the federal centers for medicare and
medicaid services determine that it does not comply with federal law.
The enterprise is designated as an enterprise for purposes of the
taxpayer's bill of rights (TABOR) so long as it meets TABOR
requirements. The primary powers and duties of the enterprise are to:
  • Charge and collect the fee from hospitals;
  • Leverage fee revenue collected to obtain federal matching
money;
  • Utilize and deploy both fee revenue and federal matching
money in furtherance of the business purpose of the
enterprise;
  • Issue revenue bonds payable from its revenues;
  • Enter into agreements with HCPF as necessary to collect
and expend fee revenue;
  • Engage the services of private persons or entities serving as
contractors, consultants, and legal counsel for professional
and technical assistance and advice and to supply other
services related to the conduct of the affairs of the
enterprise, including the provision of additional business
services to hospitals;
  • Seek any federal waiver necessary to fund and, in
cooperation with HCPF and hospitals, support the
implementation, no earlier than October 1, 2019, of a
health care delivery reform incentive payments program
that will improve health care access and outcomes for
individuals served by HCPF while efficiently utilizing
available financial resources. The health care delivery
reform incentive payments program must include, at a
minimum, an initial planning phase to assess needs and
develop achievable outcome-based metrics to be used to
measure progress towards specified program goals and
address specified focus areas.
  • Adopt and amend or repeal policies for the regulation of its
affairs and the conduct of its business.
The existing hospital provider fee program is repealed by section
18 and the existing hospital provider fee oversight and advisory board is
abolished, effective July 1, 2017.
So long as the enterprise qualifies as a TABOR-exempt enterprise,
fee revenue does not count against either the TABOR state fiscal year
spending limit or the referendum C cap, the higher statutory state fiscal
year spending limit established after the voters of the state approved
referendum C in 2005. The bill clarifies that the creation of the new
enterprise to charge and collect the fee is the creation of a new
government-owned business that provides business services to hospitals
as an enterprise for purposes of TABOR and related statutes and does not
constitute the qualification of an existing government-owned business as
a new enterprise that would require or authorize downward adjustment of
the TABOR state fiscal year spending limit or the referendum C cap.
Section 4 lowers the referendum C cap for the 2017-18 fiscal year
and subsequent fiscal years. Section 16 requires HCPF, within 120 days
of the enactment of the federal Advancing Care of Exceptional Kids
Act, to seek any federal waiver necessary to fund, in cooperation with
hospitals that meet the specified requirements, the implementation of an
enhanced pediatric health home for children with complex medical
conditions.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 07/12/2017- Capital Construction
- Education & School Finance (Pre & K-12)
- Higher Education
- State Revenue & Budget
- Transportation & Motor Vehicles
Bill History

Concerning the sustainability of rural Colorado.

 

03/27/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 07/12/2017L. Guzman (D)
J. Sonnenberg (R)
FinancecLobbyistsGovernor Signed: 05/30/2017FinanceVotes all Legislators03/27/2017

Concerning the sustainability of rural Colorado.

 

Section 3 of the bill eliminates annual statutory transfers of
general fund revenue to the highway users tax fund (HUTF) and the
capital construction fund for state fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, and
2019-20. Section 1 makes statutory general fund transfers to the state
public school fund in amounts equal to the amounts of the eliminated
statutory transfers to the HUTF for the sole purpose of reducing,
proportionally to the extent feasible, the financial impacts of inconsistent
funding of the state share of district total program on rural and small rural
school districts.
Section 2 requires executive branch departments to submit
2018-19 budget requests to the office of state planning and budgeting
(OSPB) that are at least 2% lower than their 2017-18 budgets. The OSPB
must strongly consider the budget reduction proposals made by each
department when preparing the annual executive budget proposals to the
general assembly and shall seek to ensure that the executive budget
proposal for each department is at least 2% lower than the department's
actual budget for the 2017-18 fiscal year.
Section 5 authorizes the state to execute lease-purchase
agreements for eligible state facilities to generate up to $1.35 billion of
net proceeds, with maximum annual lease payments of $100 million for
up to 20 years. Lease payments must be paid first from any legally
available money under the control of the transportation commission and
next from the general fund or any other legally available source of money.
$1.2 billion of the net proceeds are credited to the HUTF and allocated to
the state highway fund and $150 million of the net proceeds are credited
to the capital construction fund, with such amounts being reduced
proportionally if the full $1.35 billion of net proceeds is not received. As
specified in section 19, the department of transportation (CDOT) may use
the net proceeds only for qualified federal aid highway projects, with at
least 25% of the money being used for projects that are located in
counties with populations of 50,000 or less.
Section 6 creates the Colorado healthcare affordability and
sustainability enterprise (enterprise) as a type 2 agency and
government-owned business within the department of health care policy
and financing (HCPF) for the purpose of participating in the
implementation and administration of a Colorado healthcare affordability
and sustainability program (program) on and after July 1, 2017, and
creates a board consisting of 13 members appointed by the governor with
the advice and consent of the senate to govern the enterprise. The
business purpose of the enterprise is, in exchange for the payment of a
new healthcare affordability and sustainability fee (fee) by hospitals to the
enterprise, to administer the program and thereby support hospitals that
provide uncompensated medical services to uninsured patients and
participate in publicly funded health insurance programs by:
  • Participating in a federal program that provides additional
matching money to states;
  • Using fee revenue, which must be credited to a newly
created healthcare affordability and sustainability fee fund
and used solely for purposes of the program, and federal
matching money to:
  • Reduce the amount of uncompensated care that
hospitals provide by increasing the number of
individuals covered by publicly funded health
insurance; and
  • Increase publicly funded insurance reimbursement
rates to hospitals; and
  • Providing or contracting for or arranging advisory and
consulting services to hospitals and coordinating services
to hospitals to help them more effectively and efficiently
participate in publicly funded insurance programs.
The bill does not take effect if the federal centers for medicare and
medicaid services determine that it does not comply with federal law.
The enterprise is designated as an enterprise for purposes of the
taxpayer's bill of rights (TABOR) so long as it meets TABOR
requirements. The primary powers and duties of the enterprise are to:
  • Charge and collect the fee from hospitals;
  • Leverage fee revenue collected to obtain federal matching
money;
  • Utilize and deploy both fee revenue and federal matching
money in furtherance of the business purpose of the
enterprise;
  • Issue revenue bonds payable from its revenues;
  • Enter into agreements with HCPF as necessary to collect
and expend fee revenue;
  • Engage the services of private persons or entities serving as
contractors, consultants, and legal counsel for professional
and technical assistance and advice and to supply other
services related to the conduct of the affairs of the
enterprise, including the provision of additional business
services to hospitals;
  • Seek any federal waiver necessary to fund and, in
cooperation with HCPF and hospitals, support the
implementation, no earlier than October 1, 2019, of a
health care delivery reform incentive payments program
that will improve health care access and outcomes for
individuals served by HCPF while efficiently utilizing
available financial resources. The health care delivery
reform incentive payments program must include, at a
minimum, an initial planning phase to assess needs and
develop achievable outcome-based metrics to be used to
measure progress towards specified program goals and
address specified focus areas.
  • Adopt and amend or repeal policies for the regulation of its
affairs and the conduct of its business.
The existing hospital provider fee program is repealed by section
18 and the existing hospital provider fee oversight and advisory board is
abolished, effective July 1, 2017.
So long as the enterprise qualifies as a TABOR-exempt enterprise,
fee revenue does not count against either the TABOR state fiscal year
spending limit or the referendum C cap, the higher statutory state fiscal
year spending limit established after the voters of the state approved
referendum C in 2005. The bill clarifies that the creation of the new
enterprise to charge and collect the fee is the creation of a new
government-owned business that provides business services to hospitals
as an enterprise for purposes of TABOR and related statutes and does not
constitute the qualification of an existing government-owned business as
a new enterprise that would require or authorize downward adjustment of
the TABOR state fiscal year spending limit or the referendum C cap.
Section 4 lowers the referendum C cap for the 2017-18 fiscal year
and subsequent fiscal years. Section 16 requires HCPF, within 120 days
of the enactment of the federal Advancing Care of Exceptional Kids
Act, to seek any federal waiver necessary to fund, in cooperation with
hospitals that meet the specified requirements, the implementation of an
enhanced pediatric health home for children with complex medical
conditions.

J. Becker (R)
K. Becker (D)
Votes all Legislators
SB17-303 State Highway System Funding And Financing Bill DocumentsSenate Second Reading Laid Over with Amendments to 05/11/2017 - Committee: 05/09/2017FinanceT. Neville (R)
J. Cooke (R)
P. Neville (R)
C. Wist (R)

On and after July 1, 2017, section 4 of the bill requires 10% of the
net revenue generated by existing state sales and use taxes to be credited
to the highway users tax fund, paid to the state highway fund for
allocation to the department of transportation (CDOT), and spent by
CDOT first to make payments due on any transportation revenue notes
(TRANs) issued, subject to voter approval, as required by section 7 and,
to the extent not needed for that purpose, for highway purposes or
highway-related capital improvements as specified in section 6. Section
7 requires the submission of a ballot question to the voters of the state at
the November 2017 statewide election, which, if approved, requires the
executive director of CDOT to issue TRANs in a maximum principal
amount of $3.5 billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $5.5
billion. TRANs must have a maximum repayment term of 20 years and
must be paid first from the net state sales and use tax revenue paid to the
state highway fund and allocated to CDOT by section 4 and thereafter
from any legally available money under the control of the transportation
commission. Section 8 requires TRANs proceeds to be used only to
provide sufficient funding for the completion of economically and
regionally significant state highway system projects throughout the state,
including a specific list of projects.
Section 2 eliminates required statutory transfers from the general
fund to the capital construction fund and the highway users tax fund for
state fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, and 2019-20. Section 3 requires
CDOT rules that govern the consideration of contractor bids for CDOT
projects to require consideration of all bids submitted by prequalified
contractors and prohibit shortlisting. Section 5 requires CDOT, with
respect to any transportation projects for which it awards a competitively
bid contract on or after July 1, 2018, to report on its public website within
30 days of the contract award and maintain on its website for at least one
year thereafter all information, excluding specific corporate financial
information, from all bidders submitted in response to its invitation for
bids for the project.

LobbyistsFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/07/2017- Fiscal Policy & Taxes
- Transportation & Motor Vehicles
Bill History

Concerning the funding of the state highway system.

 

04/27/2017cFull Text of BillFiscal Notes : 09/07/2017T. Neville (R)
J. Cooke (R)
cLobbyistsSenate Second Reading Laid Over with Amendments to 05/11/2017 - Committee: 05/09/2017FinanceVotes all Legislators04/27/2017

Concerning the funding of the state highway system.

 

On and after July 1, 2017, section 4 of the bill requires 10% of the
net revenue generated by existing state sales and use taxes to be credited
to the highway users tax fund, paid to the state highway fund for
allocation to the department of transportation (CDOT), and spent by
CDOT first to make payments due on any transportation revenue notes
(TRANs) issued, subject to voter approval, as required by section 7 and,
to the extent not needed for that purpose, for highway purposes or
highway-related capital improvements as specified in section 6. Section
7 requires the submission of a ballot question to the voters of the state at
the November 2017 statewide election, which, if approved, requires the
executive director of CDOT to issue TRANs in a maximum principal
amount of $3.5 billion and with a maximum repayment cost of $5.5
billion. TRANs must have a maximum repayment term of 20 years and
must be paid first from the net state sales and use tax revenue paid to the
state highway fund and allocated to CDOT by section 4 and thereafter
from any legally available money under the control of the transportation
commission. Section 8 requires TRANs proceeds to be used only to
provide sufficient funding for the completion of economically and
regionally significant state highway system projects throughout the state,
including a specific list of projects.
Section 2 eliminates required statutory transfers from the general
fund to the capital construction fund and the highway users tax fund for
state fiscal years 2017-18, 2018-19, and 2019-20. Section 3 requires
CDOT rules that govern the consideration of contractor bids for CDOT
projects to require consideration of all bids submitted by prequalified
contractors and prohibit shortlisting. Section 5 requires CDOT, with
respect to any transportation projects for which it awards a competitively
bid contract on or after July 1, 2018, to report on its public website within
30 days of the contract award and maintain on its website for at least one
year thereafter all information, excluding specific corporate financial
information, from all bidders submitted in response to its invitation for
bids for the project.

P. Neville (R)
C. Wist (R)
Votes all Legislators
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